3 Explained that this isn't technically a tax rate.
source | link

While you asked specifically about Sweden, the US also has marginal tax rates approaching, and even exceeding, 100% on low-income people. This is sometimes called the poverty trap.

One study found that the highest marginal tax rate in the USA was (in 1999) 109.2%, and applied to the next dollar earned by a full time employed single mothers with two kids, making $6.43 to $7.17/hour. The numbers may have changed in the last 20 years, but the fundamental issue is still the same.

https://www.epionline.org/wp-content/studies/shaviro_02-1999.pdf

Update: a few commenters pointed out that this isn't technically a tax rate. The economic effect is the same, though: a reduction in the household income. A second related consideration is that in 1999 (and in some states, today), health insurance premiums are a major factor. Health insurance premiums are effectively the same as taxes (the US is fairly unique in that this de-facto mandatory payment is paid to private corporations).

While you asked specifically about Sweden, the US also has marginal tax rates approaching, and even exceeding, 100% on low-income people. This is sometimes called the poverty trap.

One study found that the highest marginal tax rate in the USA was (in 1999) 109.2%, and applied to the next dollar earned by a full time employed single mothers with two kids, making $6.43 to $7.17/hour. The numbers may have changed in the last 20 years, but the fundamental issue is still the same.

https://www.epionline.org/wp-content/studies/shaviro_02-1999.pdf

While you asked specifically about Sweden, the US also has marginal tax rates approaching, and even exceeding, 100% on low-income people. This is sometimes called the poverty trap.

One study found that the highest marginal tax rate in the USA was (in 1999) 109.2%, and applied to the next dollar earned by a full time employed single mothers with two kids, making $6.43 to $7.17/hour. The numbers may have changed in the last 20 years, but the fundamental issue is still the same.

https://www.epionline.org/wp-content/studies/shaviro_02-1999.pdf

Update: a few commenters pointed out that this isn't technically a tax rate. The economic effect is the same, though: a reduction in the household income. A second related consideration is that in 1999 (and in some states, today), health insurance premiums are a major factor. Health insurance premiums are effectively the same as taxes (the US is fairly unique in that this de-facto mandatory payment is paid to private corporations).

2 Corrected a misreading of the study.
source | link

While you asked specifically about Sweden, the US also has marginal tax rates approaching, and even exceeding, 100% on low-income people. This is sometimes called the poverty trap.

One study found that the highest marginal tax rate in the USA was (in 1999) 109.2%, and applied to the next dollar earned by a full time employed single mothers with two kids, getting a raise frommaking $6.43 to $7.17/hour. The numbers may have changed in the last 20 years, but the fundamental issue is still the same.

https://www.epionline.org/wp-content/studies/shaviro_02-1999.pdf

While you asked specifically about Sweden, the US also has marginal tax rates approaching, and even exceeding, 100% on low-income people. This is sometimes called the poverty trap.

One study found that the highest marginal tax rate in the USA was (in 1999) 109.2%, and applied to full time employed single mothers with two kids, getting a raise from $6.43 to $7.17. The numbers may have changed in the last 20 years, but the fundamental issue is still the same.

https://www.epionline.org/wp-content/studies/shaviro_02-1999.pdf

While you asked specifically about Sweden, the US also has marginal tax rates approaching, and even exceeding, 100% on low-income people. This is sometimes called the poverty trap.

One study found that the highest marginal tax rate in the USA was (in 1999) 109.2%, and applied to the next dollar earned by a full time employed single mothers with two kids, making $6.43 to $7.17/hour. The numbers may have changed in the last 20 years, but the fundamental issue is still the same.

https://www.epionline.org/wp-content/studies/shaviro_02-1999.pdf

1
source | link

While you asked specifically about Sweden, the US also has marginal tax rates approaching, and even exceeding, 100% on low-income people. This is sometimes called the poverty trap.

One study found that the highest marginal tax rate in the USA was (in 1999) 109.2%, and applied to full time employed single mothers with two kids, getting a raise from $6.43 to $7.17. The numbers may have changed in the last 20 years, but the fundamental issue is still the same.

https://www.epionline.org/wp-content/studies/shaviro_02-1999.pdf