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A recent essay in the New York Times by Claire Cain Miller, entitled recent NYT essayHow to Raise a Feminist Son, claims that: "Until the mid-20th century, pink was the boy color and blue was for girls."

Until the mid-20th century, pink was the boy color and blue was for girls.

It, in turn, cites an Ask Smithsonian older articleblog post in the Smithsonian by Jeanne Maglaty.

How well-grounded in the historical evidence is this claim?

A recent NYT essay claims that: "Until the mid-20th century, pink was the boy color and blue was for girls." It, in turn, cites an older article in the Smithsonian by Jeanne Maglaty.

How well-grounded in the historical evidence is this claim?

A recent essay in the New York Times by Claire Cain Miller, entitled How to Raise a Feminist Son, claims that:

Until the mid-20th century, pink was the boy color and blue was for girls.

It, in turn, cites an Ask Smithsonian blog post by Jeanne Maglaty.

How well-grounded in the historical evidence is this claim?

4 Remove addendum, since the answers now contain and expand on this information
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A recent NYT essay claims that: "Until the mid-20th century, pink was the boy color and blue was for girls." It, in turn, cites an older article in the Smithsonian by Jeanne Maglaty.

How well-grounded in the historical evidence is this claim?

Addendum: The Wikipedia page on Pink lists 5 additional sources in favor of the claim, but this peer reviewed academic paper by Marco Del Giudice (a psychology professor at the University of New Mexico) argues that the reversal is akin to an urban myth (and isn't mentioned at all in the Wikipedia article).

A recent NYT essay claims that: "Until the mid-20th century, pink was the boy color and blue was for girls." It, in turn, cites an older article in the Smithsonian by Jeanne Maglaty.

How well-grounded in the historical evidence is this claim?

Addendum: The Wikipedia page on Pink lists 5 additional sources in favor of the claim, but this peer reviewed academic paper by Marco Del Giudice (a psychology professor at the University of New Mexico) argues that the reversal is akin to an urban myth (and isn't mentioned at all in the Wikipedia article).

A recent NYT essay claims that: "Until the mid-20th century, pink was the boy color and blue was for girls." It, in turn, cites an older article in the Smithsonian by Jeanne Maglaty.

How well-grounded in the historical evidence is this claim?

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