Tweeted twitter.com/StackSkeptic/status/861581210941878272
3 Add closing parenthesis
source | link

Robert Conquest was an historian who is sometimes quoted for his "Three Laws of Politics":

  • Everyone is conservative about what he knows best.
  • Any organization not explicitly right-wing sooner or later becomes left-wing.
  • The simplest way to explain the behavior of any bureaucratic organization is to assume that it is controlled by a cabal of its enemies.

While these laws have been attributed to him (e.g. by John Derbyshire, a columnist for the National Review in 2003), it isn't clear that he ever stated them.

A Google search revealed either people copying and pasting from John Derbyshire or just writing up their own spin on the issue.

Did Robert Conquest ever write down his "Laws"?

Robert Conquest was an historian who is sometimes quoted for his "Three Laws of Politics":

  • Everyone is conservative about what he knows best.
  • Any organization not explicitly right-wing sooner or later becomes left-wing.
  • The simplest way to explain the behavior of any bureaucratic organization is to assume that it is controlled by a cabal of its enemies.

While these laws have been attributed to him (e.g. by John Derbyshire, a columnist for the National Review in 2003, it isn't clear that he ever stated them.

A Google search revealed either people copying and pasting from John Derbyshire or just writing up their own spin on the issue.

Did Robert Conquest ever write down his "Laws"?

Robert Conquest was an historian who is sometimes quoted for his "Three Laws of Politics":

  • Everyone is conservative about what he knows best.
  • Any organization not explicitly right-wing sooner or later becomes left-wing.
  • The simplest way to explain the behavior of any bureaucratic organization is to assume that it is controlled by a cabal of its enemies.

While these laws have been attributed to him (e.g. by John Derbyshire, a columnist for the National Review in 2003), it isn't clear that he ever stated them.

A Google search revealed either people copying and pasting from John Derbyshire or just writing up their own spin on the issue.

Did Robert Conquest ever write down his "Laws"?

2 Added context. Removed false dichotomy. His justification is off-topic. Whether he said them is on topic.
source | link

Did Robert Conquest ever explainstate his "Three Laws of Politics"?

On June 25th 2003,Robert Conquest was an historian who is sometimes quoted for his "Three Laws of Politics":

  • Everyone is conservative about what he knows best.
  • Any organization not explicitly right-wing sooner or later becomes left-wing.
  • The simplest way to explain the behavior of any bureaucratic organization is to assume that it is controlled by a cabal of its enemies.

While these laws have been attributed to him (e.g. by John Derbyshire, a columnist for the National Review in 2003 wrote:, it isn't clear that he ever stated them.

Several readers have asked me for Robert Conquest's Three Laws of politics. As best I can remember, they are:

  1. Everyone is conservative about what he knows best.

  2. Any organization not explicitly and constitutionally right-wing will sooner or later become left-wing.

  3. The behavior of any bureaucratic organization can best be understood by assuming that it is controlled by a secret cabal of its enemies.

I was very curious to learn more about Robert Conquest's Laws, and would desire to read Robert's own reasons for why he wrote the laws, but unfortunately aA Google search revealed either people copying and pasting from John Derbyshire or just writing up their own spin on the issue.

HasDid Robert Conquest ever writtenwrite down his "Laws" and justified them? Or is John Derbyshire the only source we have for these Laws ever existing?

Did Robert Conquest ever explain his "Three Laws of Politics"?

On June 25th 2003, John Derbyshire, a columnist for the National Review wrote:

Several readers have asked me for Robert Conquest's Three Laws of politics. As best I can remember, they are:

  1. Everyone is conservative about what he knows best.

  2. Any organization not explicitly and constitutionally right-wing will sooner or later become left-wing.

  3. The behavior of any bureaucratic organization can best be understood by assuming that it is controlled by a secret cabal of its enemies.

I was very curious to learn more about Robert Conquest's Laws, and would desire to read Robert's own reasons for why he wrote the laws, but unfortunately a Google search revealed either people copying and pasting from John Derbyshire or just writing up their own spin on the issue.

Has Robert Conquest ever written down his "Laws" and justified them? Or is John Derbyshire the only source we have for these Laws ever existing?

Did Robert Conquest ever state his "Three Laws of Politics"?

Robert Conquest was an historian who is sometimes quoted for his "Three Laws of Politics":

  • Everyone is conservative about what he knows best.
  • Any organization not explicitly right-wing sooner or later becomes left-wing.
  • The simplest way to explain the behavior of any bureaucratic organization is to assume that it is controlled by a cabal of its enemies.

While these laws have been attributed to him (e.g. by John Derbyshire, a columnist for the National Review in 2003, it isn't clear that he ever stated them.

A Google search revealed either people copying and pasting from John Derbyshire or just writing up their own spin on the issue.

Did Robert Conquest ever write down his "Laws"?

1
source | link

Did Robert Conquest ever explain his "Three Laws of Politics"?

On June 25th 2003, John Derbyshire, a columnist for the National Review wrote:

Several readers have asked me for Robert Conquest's Three Laws of politics. As best I can remember, they are:

  1. Everyone is conservative about what he knows best.

  2. Any organization not explicitly and constitutionally right-wing will sooner or later become left-wing.

  3. The behavior of any bureaucratic organization can best be understood by assuming that it is controlled by a secret cabal of its enemies.

I was very curious to learn more about Robert Conquest's Laws, and would desire to read Robert's own reasons for why he wrote the laws, but unfortunately a Google search revealed either people copying and pasting from John Derbyshire or just writing up their own spin on the issue.

Has Robert Conquest ever written down his "Laws" and justified them? Or is John Derbyshire the only source we have for these Laws ever existing?