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Generally, yes, but that's not necessarily andan argument for overbooking as aggressively as they do (the context in which the claim was made). They don't make a huge amount of profit per customer, as per the numbers in A Bailey's answer. By the same token, since they move such a large volume of customers, they don't incur huge per customer costs, either.

So, the argument that they must overbook because they don't make a large amount of profit per customer is offset by the fact that reducing the overbooking, slightly, would also mean they're only losing a small amount of profit per customer, as well.

You can't claim one and ignore the other. Airlines are hugely profitable. 2016 was a record year for them, as a whole ($35.6 B in profits), and 2015 was a record before that ($25.6 B in profits). Fuel costs are 1/3 what they were two years ago, yet fares are still about the same.

NYT: Airlines reap record profits, passengers get peanuts

IATA: Another Strong Year Expected For Airlines

CNN Money: Airlines posted record profits last year (2015)

Generally, yes, but that's not necessarily and argument for overbooking as aggressively as they do (the context in which the claim was made). They don't make a huge amount of profit per customer, as per the numbers in A Bailey's answer. By the same token, since they move such a large volume of customers, they don't incur huge per customer costs, either.

So, the argument that they must overbook because they don't make a large amount of profit per customer is offset by the fact that reducing the overbooking, slightly, would also mean they're only losing a small amount of profit per customer, as well.

You can't claim one and ignore the other. Airlines are hugely profitable. 2016 was a record year for them, as a whole ($35.6 B in profits), and 2015 was a record before that ($25.6 B in profits). Fuel costs are 1/3 what they were two years ago, yet fares are still about the same.

NYT: Airlines reap record profits, passengers get peanuts

IATA: Another Strong Year Expected For Airlines

CNN Money: Airlines posted record profits last year (2015)

Generally, yes, but that's not necessarily an argument for overbooking as aggressively as they do (the context in which the claim was made). They don't make a huge amount of profit per customer, as per the numbers in A Bailey's answer. By the same token, since they move such a large volume of customers, they don't incur huge per customer costs, either.

So, the argument that they must overbook because they don't make a large amount of profit per customer is offset by the fact that reducing the overbooking, slightly, would also mean they're only losing a small amount of profit per customer, as well.

You can't claim one and ignore the other. Airlines are hugely profitable. 2016 was a record year for them, as a whole ($35.6 B in profits), and 2015 was a record before that ($25.6 B in profits). Fuel costs are 1/3 what they were two years ago, yet fares are still about the same.

NYT: Airlines reap record profits, passengers get peanuts

IATA: Another Strong Year Expected For Airlines

CNN Money: Airlines posted record profits last year (2015)

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Generally, yes, but that's not necessarily and argument for overbooking as aggressively as they do (the context in which the claim was made). They don't make a huge amount of profit per customer, as per the numbers in A Bailey's answer. By the same token, since they move such a large volume of customers, they don't incur huge per customer costs, either.

So, the argument that they must overbook because they don't make a large amount of profit per customer is offset by the fact that reducing the overbooking, slightly, would also mean they're only losing a small amount of profit per customer, as well.

You can't claim one and ignore the other. Airlines are hugely profitable. 2016 was a record year for them, as a whole ($35.6 B in profits), and 2015 was a record before that ($25.6 B in profits). Fuel costs are 1/3 what they were two years ago, yet fares are still about the same.

NYT: Airlines reap record profits, passengers get peanuts

IATA: Another Strong Year Expected For Airlines

CNN Money: Airlines posted record profits last year (2015)