Post Closed as "off-topic" by DavePhD, Brythan, user5341, pericles316, Avery
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I got this one from some political debate; unfortunately no reference to it. I know the shuttle was a boondoggle; but I find it hard to believe it was really that outrageous.

On the other hand, the best attested reports for the per-launch cost of a Saturn yielded over a billion dollars in today's dollars, which is preposterous. (This currently comes up directly on the google search results page for $1.16 billion). I suspect the error is including the large development cost over a production run of only 13 payload-capable boosters with 2 unused. The shuttle's cost given by the same method yields 450 million which is not obviously out-of-range.

Here's a link for some more reasonable number's on Saturn V https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=6742.0 (yields $565 million per Saturn V; but also yields $200 million for the shuttle). Some of the other numbers on the same page are obviously wrong though so I take the whole thing with a huge grain of salt.

I got this one from some political debate; unfortunately no reference to it. I know the shuttle was a boondoggle; but I find it hard to believe it was really that outrageous.

On the other hand, the best attested reports for the per-launch cost of a Saturn yielded over a billion dollars in today's dollars, which is preposterous. (This currently comes up directly on the google search results page for $1.16 billion). I suspect the error is including the large development cost over a production run of only 13 payload-capable boosters with 2 unused. The shuttle's cost given by the same method yields 450 million which is not obviously out-of-range.

I got this one from some political debate; unfortunately no reference to it. I know the shuttle was a boondoggle; but I find it hard to believe it was really that outrageous.

On the other hand, the best attested reports for the per-launch cost of a Saturn yielded over a billion dollars in today's dollars, which is preposterous. (This currently comes up directly on the google search results page for $1.16 billion). I suspect the error is including the large development cost over a production run of only 13 payload-capable boosters with 2 unused. The shuttle's cost given by the same method yields 450 million which is not obviously out-of-range.

Here's a link for some more reasonable number's on Saturn V https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=6742.0 (yields $565 million per Saturn V; but also yields $200 million for the shuttle). Some of the other numbers on the same page are obviously wrong though so I take the whole thing with a huge grain of salt.

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Did the shuttle cost more per launch than a Saturn V (after inflation)?

I got this one from some political debate; unfortunately no reference to it. I know the shuttle was a boondoggle; but I find it hard to believe it was really that outrageous.

On the other hand, the best attested reports for the per-launch cost of a Saturn yielded over a billion dollars in today's dollars, which is preposterous. (This currently comes up directly on the google search results page for $1.16 billion). I suspect the error is including the large development cost over a production run of only 13 payload-capable boosters with 2 unused. The shuttle's cost given by the same method yields 450 million which is not obviously out-of-range.