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ProbablyYes, if you measure "living standards" in monetary terms only.

However, this is a faulty comparison. You are, after all, slicing out a segment of the US population characterized by long-term advantages, and comparing it to the entire spectrum of another countrys population.

American-Scandinavians are 99% people descended from 19th century emigration.

They don’t include a lot of Black, Latino, Asian, or Native Americans, nor if we go back a bit do they include members of other groups that were previously given the stink-eye, such as Irish or Italians. So when you use “Scandinavian-Americans” as a comparison group, this is a group of the American population where every member has enough family stability to follow their families back for 100 + years, and whose families have been part of the top ethnic demographic for that time.

If you were to compare it to a similarly selected sliceI do not know of theany Scandinavian nations, I suspect that keep track of groups by criteria such as ability to track their family back in the UScountry, or long-term presence in an advantage ethnic group. The nearest would vanishprobably be the Swedish and Danish aristocracy.

You can look at comparisons across the entire country for some definitions of "standard of living" at the Human Development Index or Legatums Prosperity Index.

Probably, if you measure "living standards" in monetary terms only.

You are, after all, slicing out a segment of the US population characterized by long-term advantages, and comparing it to the entire spectrum of another countrys population.

American-Scandinavians are 99% people descended from 19th century emigration.

They don’t include a lot of Black, Latino, Asian, or Native Americans, nor if we go back a bit do they include members of other groups that were previously given the stink-eye, such as Irish or Italians. So when you use “Scandinavian-Americans” as a comparison group, this is a group of the American population where every member has enough family stability to follow their families back for 100 + years, and whose families have been part of the top ethnic demographic for that time.

If you were to compare it to a similarly selected slice of the Scandinavian nations, I suspect the US advantage would vanish.

Yes, if you measure "living standards" in monetary terms only.

However, this is a faulty comparison. You are slicing out a segment of the US population characterized by long-term advantages, and comparing it to the entire spectrum of another countrys population.

American-Scandinavians are 99% people descended from 19th century emigration.

They don’t include a lot of Black, Latino, Asian, or Native Americans, nor if we go back a bit do they include members of other groups that were previously given the stink-eye, such as Irish or Italians. So when you use “Scandinavian-Americans” as a comparison group, this is a group of the American population where every member has enough family stability to follow their families back for 100 + years, and whose families have been part of the top ethnic demographic for that time.

I do not know of any Scandinavian nations that keep track of groups by criteria such as ability to track their family back in the country, or long-term presence in an advantage ethnic group. The nearest would probably be the Swedish and Danish aristocracy.

You can look at comparisons across the entire country for some definitions of "standard of living" at the Human Development Index or Legatums Prosperity Index.

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Probably, if you measure "living standards" in monetary terms only.

You are, after all, slicing out a segment of the US population characterized by long-term advantages, and comparing it to the entire spectrum of another countrys population.

American-Scandinavians are 99% people descended from 19th century emigration.

They don’t include a lot of Black, Latino, Asian, or Native Americans, nor if we go back a bit do they include members of other groups that were previously given the stink-eye, such as Irish or Italians. So when you use “Scandinavian-Americans” as a comparison group, this is a group of the American population where every member has enough family stability to follow their families back for 100 + years, and whose families have been part of the top ethnic demographic for that time.

If you were to compare it to a similarly selected slice of the Scandinavian nations, I suspect the US advantage would vanish.