3 deleted 72 characters in body
source | link

Cognition, Religion & Theology logo

The referred research project is called Cognition, Religion and TheologyCognition, Religion and Theology, and summaries of the topics covered are available (containing citations to actual publications, including empirical research).

The project has an FAQFAQ that states the project goal as follows:

The overarching goal of the project is to support scientific research that promises to yield new evidence regarding how the structures of human minds inform and constrain religious expression. The project will conduct research on the cognitive underpinnings of religious concepts and practices – for example, ideas about gods and spirits, the afterlife, spirit possession, prayer, ritual, religious expertise, and connections between religious thought and morality and pro-social behaviour. Research is not limited to any particular religious belief or tradition. Indeed, much scholarship in this area is concerned to explain broad patterns of recurrence and variation in religious concepts and practices across diverse cultural and ecological contexts, and throughout history and pre-history. The project forms part of a broader field of interdisciplinary scholarship on the cognitive foundations of cultural expression more generally.

On the front page the research team is introduced:

The research team consists of experimental psychologist Dr Justin Barrett (Primary Investigator, Centre for Anthropology and Mind), philosopher Prof Roger Trigg (Co-Investigator, Ian Ramsey Centre), and Dr Miguel Farais (Theology). Ms Ann Cowie is Programme Administrator.

It seems to me like the research would lean towards philosophy and theology. However, the project has included a huge amount of research on different topics by different teams, and I can't currently be bothered to really look deep into their research.


EDIT: A couple of quite good articles from New Scientist say that humans find purpose even where there's none and that children naturally believe in supernatural things. These articles are be based on empirical research (though of course New Scientist is no peer-reviewed journal).

I've heard this kind of claims elsewhere, and I find quite believable that:

  • People believe in purpose (even in some random things)
  • Children can believe in God/gods without anyone telling them to

I guess one could simplify and combine a prioris like these, and come up with the claim "human thought processes are rooted to religious concepts".

Cognition, Religion & Theology logo

The referred research project is called Cognition, Religion and Theology, and summaries of the topics covered are available (containing citations to actual publications, including empirical research).

The project has an FAQ that states the project goal as follows:

The overarching goal of the project is to support scientific research that promises to yield new evidence regarding how the structures of human minds inform and constrain religious expression. The project will conduct research on the cognitive underpinnings of religious concepts and practices – for example, ideas about gods and spirits, the afterlife, spirit possession, prayer, ritual, religious expertise, and connections between religious thought and morality and pro-social behaviour. Research is not limited to any particular religious belief or tradition. Indeed, much scholarship in this area is concerned to explain broad patterns of recurrence and variation in religious concepts and practices across diverse cultural and ecological contexts, and throughout history and pre-history. The project forms part of a broader field of interdisciplinary scholarship on the cognitive foundations of cultural expression more generally.

On the front page the research team is introduced:

The research team consists of experimental psychologist Dr Justin Barrett (Primary Investigator, Centre for Anthropology and Mind), philosopher Prof Roger Trigg (Co-Investigator, Ian Ramsey Centre), and Dr Miguel Farais (Theology). Ms Ann Cowie is Programme Administrator.

It seems to me like the research would lean towards philosophy and theology. However, the project has included a huge amount of research on different topics by different teams, and I can't currently be bothered to really look deep into their research.


EDIT: A couple of quite good articles from New Scientist say that humans find purpose even where there's none and that children naturally believe in supernatural things. These articles are be based on empirical research (though of course New Scientist is no peer-reviewed journal).

I've heard this kind of claims elsewhere, and I find quite believable that:

  • People believe in purpose (even in some random things)
  • Children can believe in God/gods without anyone telling them to

I guess one could simplify and combine a prioris like these, and come up with the claim "human thought processes are rooted to religious concepts".

Cognition, Religion & Theology logo

The referred research project is called Cognition, Religion and Theology, and summaries of the topics covered are available (containing citations to actual publications, including empirical research).

The project has an FAQ that states the project goal as follows:

The overarching goal of the project is to support scientific research that promises to yield new evidence regarding how the structures of human minds inform and constrain religious expression. The project will conduct research on the cognitive underpinnings of religious concepts and practices – for example, ideas about gods and spirits, the afterlife, spirit possession, prayer, ritual, religious expertise, and connections between religious thought and morality and pro-social behaviour. Research is not limited to any particular religious belief or tradition. Indeed, much scholarship in this area is concerned to explain broad patterns of recurrence and variation in religious concepts and practices across diverse cultural and ecological contexts, and throughout history and pre-history. The project forms part of a broader field of interdisciplinary scholarship on the cognitive foundations of cultural expression more generally.

On the front page the research team is introduced:

The research team consists of experimental psychologist Dr Justin Barrett (Primary Investigator, Centre for Anthropology and Mind), philosopher Prof Roger Trigg (Co-Investigator, Ian Ramsey Centre), and Dr Miguel Farais (Theology). Ms Ann Cowie is Programme Administrator.

It seems to me like the research would lean towards philosophy and theology. However, the project has included a huge amount of research on different topics by different teams, and I can't currently be bothered to really look deep into their research.


EDIT: A couple of quite good articles from New Scientist say that humans find purpose even where there's none and that children naturally believe in supernatural things. These articles are be based on empirical research (though of course New Scientist is no peer-reviewed journal).

I've heard this kind of claims elsewhere, and I find quite believable that:

  • People believe in purpose (even in some random things)
  • Children can believe in God/gods without anyone telling them to

I guess one could simplify and combine a prioris like these, and come up with the claim "human thought processes are rooted to religious concepts".

2 belief in purpose, links to new scientist
source | link

Cognition, Religion & Theology logo

The referred research project is called Cognition, Religion and Theology, and summaries of the topics covered are available (containing citations to actual publications, including empirical research).

The project has an FAQ that states the project goal as follows:

The overarching goal of the project is to support scientific research that promises to yield new evidence regarding how the structures of human minds inform and constrain religious expression. The project will conduct research on the cognitive underpinnings of religious concepts and practices – for example, ideas about gods and spirits, the afterlife, spirit possession, prayer, ritual, religious expertise, and connections between religious thought and morality and pro-social behaviour. Research is not limited to any particular religious belief or tradition. Indeed, much scholarship in this area is concerned to explain broad patterns of recurrence and variation in religious concepts and practices across diverse cultural and ecological contexts, and throughout history and pre-history. The project forms part of a broader field of interdisciplinary scholarship on the cognitive foundations of cultural expression more generally.

On the front page the research team is introduced:

The research team consists of experimental psychologist Dr Justin Barrett (Primary Investigator, Centre for Anthropology and Mind), philosopher Prof Roger Trigg (Co-Investigator, Ian Ramsey Centre), and Dr Miguel Farais (Theology). Ms Ann Cowie is Programme Administrator.

It seems to me like the research would lean towards philosophy and theology. However, the project has included a huge amount of research on different topics by different teams, and I can't currently be bothered to really look deep into their research.


EDIT: A couple of quite good articles from New Scientist say that humans find purpose even where there's none and that children naturally believe in supernatural things. These articles are be based on empirical research (though of course New Scientist is no peer-reviewed journal).

I've heard this kind of claims elsewhere, and I find quite believable that:

  • People believe in purpose (even in some random things)
  • Children can believe in God/gods without anyone telling them to

I guess one could simplify and combine a prioris like these, and come up with the claim "human thought processes are rooted to religious concepts".

Cognition, Religion & Theology logo

The referred research project is called Cognition, Religion and Theology, and summaries of the topics covered are available (containing citations to actual publications, including empirical research).

The project has an FAQ that states the project goal as follows:

The overarching goal of the project is to support scientific research that promises to yield new evidence regarding how the structures of human minds inform and constrain religious expression. The project will conduct research on the cognitive underpinnings of religious concepts and practices – for example, ideas about gods and spirits, the afterlife, spirit possession, prayer, ritual, religious expertise, and connections between religious thought and morality and pro-social behaviour. Research is not limited to any particular religious belief or tradition. Indeed, much scholarship in this area is concerned to explain broad patterns of recurrence and variation in religious concepts and practices across diverse cultural and ecological contexts, and throughout history and pre-history. The project forms part of a broader field of interdisciplinary scholarship on the cognitive foundations of cultural expression more generally.

On the front page the research team is introduced:

The research team consists of experimental psychologist Dr Justin Barrett (Primary Investigator, Centre for Anthropology and Mind), philosopher Prof Roger Trigg (Co-Investigator, Ian Ramsey Centre), and Dr Miguel Farais (Theology). Ms Ann Cowie is Programme Administrator.

It seems to me like the research would lean towards philosophy and theology. However, the project has included a huge amount of research on different topics by different teams, and I can't currently be bothered to really look deep into their research.

Cognition, Religion & Theology logo

The referred research project is called Cognition, Religion and Theology, and summaries of the topics covered are available (containing citations to actual publications, including empirical research).

The project has an FAQ that states the project goal as follows:

The overarching goal of the project is to support scientific research that promises to yield new evidence regarding how the structures of human minds inform and constrain religious expression. The project will conduct research on the cognitive underpinnings of religious concepts and practices – for example, ideas about gods and spirits, the afterlife, spirit possession, prayer, ritual, religious expertise, and connections between religious thought and morality and pro-social behaviour. Research is not limited to any particular religious belief or tradition. Indeed, much scholarship in this area is concerned to explain broad patterns of recurrence and variation in religious concepts and practices across diverse cultural and ecological contexts, and throughout history and pre-history. The project forms part of a broader field of interdisciplinary scholarship on the cognitive foundations of cultural expression more generally.

On the front page the research team is introduced:

The research team consists of experimental psychologist Dr Justin Barrett (Primary Investigator, Centre for Anthropology and Mind), philosopher Prof Roger Trigg (Co-Investigator, Ian Ramsey Centre), and Dr Miguel Farais (Theology). Ms Ann Cowie is Programme Administrator.

It seems to me like the research would lean towards philosophy and theology. However, the project has included a huge amount of research on different topics by different teams, and I can't currently be bothered to really look deep into their research.


EDIT: A couple of quite good articles from New Scientist say that humans find purpose even where there's none and that children naturally believe in supernatural things. These articles are be based on empirical research (though of course New Scientist is no peer-reviewed journal).

I've heard this kind of claims elsewhere, and I find quite believable that:

  • People believe in purpose (even in some random things)
  • Children can believe in God/gods without anyone telling them to

I guess one could simplify and combine a prioris like these, and come up with the claim "human thought processes are rooted to religious concepts".

1
source | link

Cognition, Religion & Theology logo

The referred research project is called Cognition, Religion and Theology, and summaries of the topics covered are available (containing citations to actual publications, including empirical research).

The project has an FAQ that states the project goal as follows:

The overarching goal of the project is to support scientific research that promises to yield new evidence regarding how the structures of human minds inform and constrain religious expression. The project will conduct research on the cognitive underpinnings of religious concepts and practices – for example, ideas about gods and spirits, the afterlife, spirit possession, prayer, ritual, religious expertise, and connections between religious thought and morality and pro-social behaviour. Research is not limited to any particular religious belief or tradition. Indeed, much scholarship in this area is concerned to explain broad patterns of recurrence and variation in religious concepts and practices across diverse cultural and ecological contexts, and throughout history and pre-history. The project forms part of a broader field of interdisciplinary scholarship on the cognitive foundations of cultural expression more generally.

On the front page the research team is introduced:

The research team consists of experimental psychologist Dr Justin Barrett (Primary Investigator, Centre for Anthropology and Mind), philosopher Prof Roger Trigg (Co-Investigator, Ian Ramsey Centre), and Dr Miguel Farais (Theology). Ms Ann Cowie is Programme Administrator.

It seems to me like the research would lean towards philosophy and theology. However, the project has included a huge amount of research on different topics by different teams, and I can't currently be bothered to really look deep into their research.