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There are three ways of currently trying to define what skin color ancient Egyptians had: History records, DNA and language. All three seem to agree on Egyptians having a darker complexion, however the exact skin color - like it happens with almost any person - is impossible and useless to define in a white-black dichotomy. The conclusion in this answerthis answer is absolutely correct, we are using modern cultural definitions where scientific evidence might not be conclusive (or relevant).

What Egyptians said about themselves:

  • Herodotus said Egyptians had black skin and woolly hair, which is how he said the Ethiopians looked too.
  • Aristotle called both the Ethiopians and Egyptians black.
  • The Bible calls both the Ethiopians and Egyptians sons of Ham.
  • The Egyptians saw themselves as belonging to their own race, different from blacks to the south – but also different from all their other neighbours.
  • On the other hand: They called themselves kemet - “black”, though some say it just means they are from the land of black soil (the Nile).
  • They said they came from the land of Punt – a place they drew as having elephants and giraffes.

What the DNA says:

In 2008, S. O. Y. Keita wrote:

"There is no scientific reason to believe that the primary ancestors of the Egyptian population emerged and evolved outside of northeast Africa.... The basic overall genetic profile of the modern population is consistent with the diversity of ancient populations that would have been indigenous to northeastern Africa and subject to the range of evolutionary influences over time, although researchers vary in the details of their explanations of those influences.

What the language says:

That language came to Egypt from Ethiopia about 12,000 years ago. However, the term is not exclusive to the modern country of Ethiopia. According to early Greek writers, Ethiopia was an empire originally situated between Ta-Seti in Lower Kemet and the confluence of the White and Blue Niles.

Ethiopia is the English transliteration of the Greek word "Αιθιοπα" (or Aithiopia) which originates from the Greek word "Αιθιοψ" or "aithiops" which literally means "charred or burnt." "Aithiops" is in fact composed of "αιθιω" (meaning "I burn") and "ωψ" (meaning face or complexion).

Claudius Ptolemy (90 - 168 AD), a Roman citizen who lived in Alexandria, used "Ethiopia" as a racial term. In his Tetrabiblos: Or Quadripartite, he tried to explain the physical characteristics of people around the world saying, "They are consequently black in complexion, and have thick and curled hair...and they are called by the common name of Aethiopians."

There are three ways of currently trying to define what skin color ancient Egyptians had: History records, DNA and language. All three seem to agree on Egyptians having a darker complexion, however the exact skin color - like it happens with almost any person - is impossible and useless to define in a white-black dichotomy. The conclusion in this answer is absolutely correct, we are using modern cultural definitions where scientific evidence might not be conclusive (or relevant).

What Egyptians said about themselves:

  • Herodotus said Egyptians had black skin and woolly hair, which is how he said the Ethiopians looked too.
  • Aristotle called both the Ethiopians and Egyptians black.
  • The Bible calls both the Ethiopians and Egyptians sons of Ham.
  • The Egyptians saw themselves as belonging to their own race, different from blacks to the south – but also different from all their other neighbours.
  • On the other hand: They called themselves kemet - “black”, though some say it just means they are from the land of black soil (the Nile).
  • They said they came from the land of Punt – a place they drew as having elephants and giraffes.

What the DNA says:

In 2008, S. O. Y. Keita wrote:

"There is no scientific reason to believe that the primary ancestors of the Egyptian population emerged and evolved outside of northeast Africa.... The basic overall genetic profile of the modern population is consistent with the diversity of ancient populations that would have been indigenous to northeastern Africa and subject to the range of evolutionary influences over time, although researchers vary in the details of their explanations of those influences.

What the language says:

That language came to Egypt from Ethiopia about 12,000 years ago. However, the term is not exclusive to the modern country of Ethiopia. According to early Greek writers, Ethiopia was an empire originally situated between Ta-Seti in Lower Kemet and the confluence of the White and Blue Niles.

Ethiopia is the English transliteration of the Greek word "Αιθιοπα" (or Aithiopia) which originates from the Greek word "Αιθιοψ" or "aithiops" which literally means "charred or burnt." "Aithiops" is in fact composed of "αιθιω" (meaning "I burn") and "ωψ" (meaning face or complexion).

Claudius Ptolemy (90 - 168 AD), a Roman citizen who lived in Alexandria, used "Ethiopia" as a racial term. In his Tetrabiblos: Or Quadripartite, he tried to explain the physical characteristics of people around the world saying, "They are consequently black in complexion, and have thick and curled hair...and they are called by the common name of Aethiopians."

There are three ways of currently trying to define what skin color ancient Egyptians had: History records, DNA and language. All three seem to agree on Egyptians having a darker complexion, however the exact skin color - like it happens with almost any person - is impossible and useless to define in a white-black dichotomy. The conclusion in this answer is absolutely correct, we are using modern cultural definitions where scientific evidence might not be conclusive (or relevant).

What Egyptians said about themselves:

  • Herodotus said Egyptians had black skin and woolly hair, which is how he said the Ethiopians looked too.
  • Aristotle called both the Ethiopians and Egyptians black.
  • The Bible calls both the Ethiopians and Egyptians sons of Ham.
  • The Egyptians saw themselves as belonging to their own race, different from blacks to the south – but also different from all their other neighbours.
  • On the other hand: They called themselves kemet - “black”, though some say it just means they are from the land of black soil (the Nile).
  • They said they came from the land of Punt – a place they drew as having elephants and giraffes.

What the DNA says:

In 2008, S. O. Y. Keita wrote:

"There is no scientific reason to believe that the primary ancestors of the Egyptian population emerged and evolved outside of northeast Africa.... The basic overall genetic profile of the modern population is consistent with the diversity of ancient populations that would have been indigenous to northeastern Africa and subject to the range of evolutionary influences over time, although researchers vary in the details of their explanations of those influences.

What the language says:

That language came to Egypt from Ethiopia about 12,000 years ago. However, the term is not exclusive to the modern country of Ethiopia. According to early Greek writers, Ethiopia was an empire originally situated between Ta-Seti in Lower Kemet and the confluence of the White and Blue Niles.

Ethiopia is the English transliteration of the Greek word "Αιθιοπα" (or Aithiopia) which originates from the Greek word "Αιθιοψ" or "aithiops" which literally means "charred or burnt." "Aithiops" is in fact composed of "αιθιω" (meaning "I burn") and "ωψ" (meaning face or complexion).

Claudius Ptolemy (90 - 168 AD), a Roman citizen who lived in Alexandria, used "Ethiopia" as a racial term. In his Tetrabiblos: Or Quadripartite, he tried to explain the physical characteristics of people around the world saying, "They are consequently black in complexion, and have thick and curled hair...and they are called by the common name of Aethiopians."

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source | link

There are three ways of currently trying to define what skin color ancient Egyptians had: History records, DNA and language. All three seem to agree on Egyptians having a darker complexitycomplexion, however the exact skin color - like it happens with almost any person - is impossible and useless to define in a white-black dichotomy. The conclusion in this answer is absolutely correct, we are using modern cultural definitions where scientific evidence might not be conclusive (or relevant).

What Egyptians said about themselves:

  • Herodotus said Egyptians had black skin and woolly hair, which is how he said the Ethiopians looked too.
  • Aristotle called both the Ethiopians and Egyptians black.
  • The Bible calls both the Ethiopians and Egyptians sons of Ham.
  • The Egyptians saw themselves as belonging to their own race, different from blacks to the south – but also different from all their other neighbours.
  • On the other hand: They called themselves kemet - “black”, though some say it just means they are from the land of black soil (the Nile).
  • They said they came from the land of Punt – a place they drew as having elephants and giraffes.

What the DNA says:

In 2008, S. O. Y. Keita wrote:

"There is no scientific reason to believe that the primary ancestors of the Egyptian population emerged and evolved outside of northeast Africa.... The basic overall genetic profile of the modern population is consistent with the diversity of ancient populations that would have been indigenous to northeastern Africa and subject to the range of evolutionary influences over time, although researchers vary in the details of their explanations of those influences.

What the language says:

That language came to Egypt from Ethiopia about 12,000 years ago. However, the term is not exclusive to the modern country of Ethiopia. According to early Greek writers, Ethiopia was an empire originally situated between Ta-Seti in Lower Kemet and the confluence of the White and Blue Niles.

Ethiopia is the English transliteration of the Greek word "Αιθιοπα" (or Aithiopia) which originates from the Greek word "Αιθιοψ" or "aithiops" which literally means "charred or burnt." "Aithiops" is in fact composed of "αιθιω" (meaning "I burn") and "ωψ" (meaning face or complexion).

Claudius Ptolemy (90 - 168 AD), a Roman citizen who lived in Alexandria, used "Ethiopia" as a racial term. In his Tetrabiblos: Or Quadripartite, he tried to explain the physical characteristics of people around the world saying, "They are consequently black in complexion, and have thick and curled hair...and they are called by the common name of Aethiopians."

There are three ways of currently trying to define what skin color ancient Egyptians had: History records, DNA and language. All three seem to agree on Egyptians having a darker complexity, however the exact skin color - like it happens with almost any person - is impossible and useless to define in a white-black dichotomy. The conclusion in this answer is absolutely correct, we are using modern cultural definitions where scientific evidence might not be conclusive (or relevant).

What Egyptians said about themselves:

  • Herodotus said Egyptians had black skin and woolly hair, which is how he said the Ethiopians looked too.
  • Aristotle called both the Ethiopians and Egyptians black.
  • The Bible calls both the Ethiopians and Egyptians sons of Ham.
  • The Egyptians saw themselves as belonging to their own race, different from blacks to the south – but also different from all their other neighbours.
  • On the other hand: They called themselves kemet - “black”, though some say it just means they are from the land of black soil (the Nile).
  • They said they came from the land of Punt – a place they drew as having elephants and giraffes.

What the DNA says:

In 2008, S. O. Y. Keita wrote:

"There is no scientific reason to believe that the primary ancestors of the Egyptian population emerged and evolved outside of northeast Africa.... The basic overall genetic profile of the modern population is consistent with the diversity of ancient populations that would have been indigenous to northeastern Africa and subject to the range of evolutionary influences over time, although researchers vary in the details of their explanations of those influences.

What the language says:

That language came to Egypt from Ethiopia about 12,000 years ago. However, the term is not exclusive to the modern country of Ethiopia. According to early Greek writers, Ethiopia was an empire originally situated between Ta-Seti in Lower Kemet and the confluence of the White and Blue Niles.

Ethiopia is the English transliteration of the Greek word "Αιθιοπα" (or Aithiopia) which originates from the Greek word "Αιθιοψ" or "aithiops" which literally means "charred or burnt." "Aithiops" is in fact composed of "αιθιω" (meaning "I burn") and "ωψ" (meaning face or complexion).

Claudius Ptolemy (90 - 168 AD), a Roman citizen who lived in Alexandria, used "Ethiopia" as a racial term. In his Tetrabiblos: Or Quadripartite, he tried to explain the physical characteristics of people around the world saying, "They are consequently black in complexion, and have thick and curled hair...and they are called by the common name of Aethiopians."

There are three ways of currently trying to define what skin color ancient Egyptians had: History records, DNA and language. All three seem to agree on Egyptians having a darker complexion, however the exact skin color - like it happens with almost any person - is impossible and useless to define in a white-black dichotomy. The conclusion in this answer is absolutely correct, we are using modern cultural definitions where scientific evidence might not be conclusive (or relevant).

What Egyptians said about themselves:

  • Herodotus said Egyptians had black skin and woolly hair, which is how he said the Ethiopians looked too.
  • Aristotle called both the Ethiopians and Egyptians black.
  • The Bible calls both the Ethiopians and Egyptians sons of Ham.
  • The Egyptians saw themselves as belonging to their own race, different from blacks to the south – but also different from all their other neighbours.
  • On the other hand: They called themselves kemet - “black”, though some say it just means they are from the land of black soil (the Nile).
  • They said they came from the land of Punt – a place they drew as having elephants and giraffes.

What the DNA says:

In 2008, S. O. Y. Keita wrote:

"There is no scientific reason to believe that the primary ancestors of the Egyptian population emerged and evolved outside of northeast Africa.... The basic overall genetic profile of the modern population is consistent with the diversity of ancient populations that would have been indigenous to northeastern Africa and subject to the range of evolutionary influences over time, although researchers vary in the details of their explanations of those influences.

What the language says:

That language came to Egypt from Ethiopia about 12,000 years ago. However, the term is not exclusive to the modern country of Ethiopia. According to early Greek writers, Ethiopia was an empire originally situated between Ta-Seti in Lower Kemet and the confluence of the White and Blue Niles.

Ethiopia is the English transliteration of the Greek word "Αιθιοπα" (or Aithiopia) which originates from the Greek word "Αιθιοψ" or "aithiops" which literally means "charred or burnt." "Aithiops" is in fact composed of "αιθιω" (meaning "I burn") and "ωψ" (meaning face or complexion).

Claudius Ptolemy (90 - 168 AD), a Roman citizen who lived in Alexandria, used "Ethiopia" as a racial term. In his Tetrabiblos: Or Quadripartite, he tried to explain the physical characteristics of people around the world saying, "They are consequently black in complexion, and have thick and curled hair...and they are called by the common name of Aethiopians."

2 deleted 1 character in body
source | link

There are three ways of currently trying to define what skin color ancient Egyptians havehad: History records, DNA and language. All three seem to agree on Egyptians having a darker complexity, however the exact skin color - like it happens with almost any person - is impossible and useless to define in a white-black dichotomy. The conclusion in this answer is absolutely correct, we are using modern cultural definitions where scientific evidence might not be conclusive (or relevant).

What Egyptians said about themselves:

  • Herodotus said Egyptians had black skin and woolly hair, which is how he said the Ethiopians looked too.
  • Aristotle called both the Ethiopians and Egyptians black.
  • The Bible calls both the Ethiopians and Egyptians sons of Ham.
  • The Egyptians saw themselves as belonging to their own race, different from blacks to the south – but also different from all their other neighbours.
  • On the other hand: They called themselves kemet - “black”, though some say it just means they are from the land of black soil (the Nile).
  • They said they came from the land of Punt – a place they drew as having elephants and giraffes.

What the DNA says:

In 2008, S. O. Y. Keita wrote:

"There is no scientific reason to believe that the primary ancestors of the Egyptian population emerged and evolved outside of northeast Africa.... The basic overall genetic profile of the modern population is consistent with the diversity of ancient populations that would have been indigenous to northeastern Africa and subject to the range of evolutionary influences over time, although researchers vary in the details of their explanations of those influences.

What the language says:

That language came to Egypt from Ethiopia about 12,000 years ago. However, the term is not exclusive to the modern country of Ethiopia. According to early Greek writers, Ethiopia was an empire originally situated between Ta-Seti in Lower Kemet and the confluence of the White and Blue Niles.

Ethiopia is the English transliteration of the Greek word "Αιθιοπα" (or Aithiopia) which originates from the Greek word "Αιθιοψ" or "aithiops" which literally means "charred or burnt." "Aithiops" is in fact composed of "αιθιω" (meaning "I burn") and "ωψ" (meaning face or complexion).

Claudius Ptolemy (90 - 168 AD), a Roman citizen who lived in Alexandria, used "Ethiopia" as a racial term. In his Tetrabiblos: Or Quadripartite, he tried to explain the physical characteristics of people around the world saying, "They are consequently black in complexion, and have thick and curled hair...and they are called by the common name of Aethiopians."

There are three ways of currently trying to define what skin color ancient Egyptians have: History records, DNA and language. All three seem to agree on Egyptians having a darker complexity, however the exact skin color - like it happens with almost any person - is impossible and useless to define in a white-black dichotomy. The conclusion in this answer is absolutely correct, we are using modern cultural definitions where scientific evidence might not be conclusive (or relevant).

What Egyptians said about themselves:

  • Herodotus said Egyptians had black skin and woolly hair, which is how he said the Ethiopians looked too.
  • Aristotle called both the Ethiopians and Egyptians black.
  • The Bible calls both the Ethiopians and Egyptians sons of Ham.
  • The Egyptians saw themselves as belonging to their own race, different from blacks to the south – but also different from all their other neighbours.
  • On the other hand: They called themselves kemet - “black”, though some say it just means they are from the land of black soil (the Nile).
  • They said they came from the land of Punt – a place they drew as having elephants and giraffes.

What the DNA says:

In 2008, S. O. Y. Keita wrote:

"There is no scientific reason to believe that the primary ancestors of the Egyptian population emerged and evolved outside of northeast Africa.... The basic overall genetic profile of the modern population is consistent with the diversity of ancient populations that would have been indigenous to northeastern Africa and subject to the range of evolutionary influences over time, although researchers vary in the details of their explanations of those influences.

What the language says:

That language came to Egypt from Ethiopia about 12,000 years ago. However, the term is not exclusive to the modern country of Ethiopia. According to early Greek writers, Ethiopia was an empire originally situated between Ta-Seti in Lower Kemet and the confluence of the White and Blue Niles.

Ethiopia is the English transliteration of the Greek word "Αιθιοπα" (or Aithiopia) which originates from the Greek word "Αιθιοψ" or "aithiops" which literally means "charred or burnt." "Aithiops" is in fact composed of "αιθιω" (meaning "I burn") and "ωψ" (meaning face or complexion).

Claudius Ptolemy (90 - 168 AD), a Roman citizen who lived in Alexandria, used "Ethiopia" as a racial term. In his Tetrabiblos: Or Quadripartite, he tried to explain the physical characteristics of people around the world saying, "They are consequently black in complexion, and have thick and curled hair...and they are called by the common name of Aethiopians."

There are three ways of currently trying to define what skin color ancient Egyptians had: History records, DNA and language. All three seem to agree on Egyptians having a darker complexity, however the exact skin color - like it happens with almost any person - is impossible and useless to define in a white-black dichotomy. The conclusion in this answer is absolutely correct, we are using modern cultural definitions where scientific evidence might not be conclusive (or relevant).

What Egyptians said about themselves:

  • Herodotus said Egyptians had black skin and woolly hair, which is how he said the Ethiopians looked too.
  • Aristotle called both the Ethiopians and Egyptians black.
  • The Bible calls both the Ethiopians and Egyptians sons of Ham.
  • The Egyptians saw themselves as belonging to their own race, different from blacks to the south – but also different from all their other neighbours.
  • On the other hand: They called themselves kemet - “black”, though some say it just means they are from the land of black soil (the Nile).
  • They said they came from the land of Punt – a place they drew as having elephants and giraffes.

What the DNA says:

In 2008, S. O. Y. Keita wrote:

"There is no scientific reason to believe that the primary ancestors of the Egyptian population emerged and evolved outside of northeast Africa.... The basic overall genetic profile of the modern population is consistent with the diversity of ancient populations that would have been indigenous to northeastern Africa and subject to the range of evolutionary influences over time, although researchers vary in the details of their explanations of those influences.

What the language says:

That language came to Egypt from Ethiopia about 12,000 years ago. However, the term is not exclusive to the modern country of Ethiopia. According to early Greek writers, Ethiopia was an empire originally situated between Ta-Seti in Lower Kemet and the confluence of the White and Blue Niles.

Ethiopia is the English transliteration of the Greek word "Αιθιοπα" (or Aithiopia) which originates from the Greek word "Αιθιοψ" or "aithiops" which literally means "charred or burnt." "Aithiops" is in fact composed of "αιθιω" (meaning "I burn") and "ωψ" (meaning face or complexion).

Claudius Ptolemy (90 - 168 AD), a Roman citizen who lived in Alexandria, used "Ethiopia" as a racial term. In his Tetrabiblos: Or Quadripartite, he tried to explain the physical characteristics of people around the world saying, "They are consequently black in complexion, and have thick and curled hair...and they are called by the common name of Aethiopians."

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