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There absolutely is evidence that biofuel production adversely affects the environment. For example, Brazil is losing vast amounts of rainforest that is clearcut and burned to plant biofuel crops (2)[2]. It has also been shown that, in the third world, biofuel combustion for heating, cooking, etc., results in 17% of the carbon dioxide and 50% of the carbon monoxide emissions that fossil fuel use does (1)[1]:

The emissions of CO from biofuel use in the developing world, 156 Tg, are about 50% of the estimated global CO emissions from fossil fuel use and industry. The emission of 0.9 Pg C (as CO2) from burning of biofuels and field residues together is small, but nonnegligible when compared with the emissions of CO2 from fossil fuel use and industry, 5.3 Pg C. (1)[1]

In the US, corn and switchgrass biofuel production by fermentation to ethanol increases carbon emissions significantly:

By using a worldwide agricultural model to estimate emissions from land-use change, we found that corn-based ethanol, instead of producing a 20% savings, nearly doubles greenhouse emissions over 30 years and increases greenhouse gases for 167 years. Biofuels from switchgrass, if grown on U.S. corn lands, increase emissions by 50%. (3)[3]

References:

  1. http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2003/2002GB001952.shtml
  2. http://www.reuters.com/article/2007/04/18/environment-biofuels-forests-dc-idUSL1755907420070418
  3. Use of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from Land-Use Change. T Searchinger, et al. Science 29 February 2008: 319 (5867), 1238-1240.[DOI:10.1126/science.1151861]

There absolutely is evidence that biofuel production adversely affects the environment. For example, Brazil is losing vast amounts of rainforest that is clearcut and burned to plant biofuel crops (2). It has also been shown that, in the third world, biofuel combustion for heating, cooking, etc., results in 17% of the carbon dioxide and 50% of the carbon monoxide emissions that fossil fuel use does (1):

The emissions of CO from biofuel use in the developing world, 156 Tg, are about 50% of the estimated global CO emissions from fossil fuel use and industry. The emission of 0.9 Pg C (as CO2) from burning of biofuels and field residues together is small, but nonnegligible when compared with the emissions of CO2 from fossil fuel use and industry, 5.3 Pg C. (1)

In the US, corn and switchgrass biofuel production by fermentation to ethanol increases carbon emissions significantly:

By using a worldwide agricultural model to estimate emissions from land-use change, we found that corn-based ethanol, instead of producing a 20% savings, nearly doubles greenhouse emissions over 30 years and increases greenhouse gases for 167 years. Biofuels from switchgrass, if grown on U.S. corn lands, increase emissions by 50%. (3)

References:

  1. http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2003/2002GB001952.shtml
  2. http://www.reuters.com/article/2007/04/18/environment-biofuels-forests-dc-idUSL1755907420070418
  3. Use of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from Land-Use Change. T Searchinger, et al. Science 29 February 2008: 319 (5867), 1238-1240.[DOI:10.1126/science.1151861]

There absolutely is evidence that biofuel production adversely affects the environment. For example, Brazil is losing vast amounts of rainforest that is clearcut and burned to plant biofuel crops [2]. It has also been shown that, in the third world, biofuel combustion for heating, cooking, etc., results in 17% of the carbon dioxide and 50% of the carbon monoxide emissions that fossil fuel use does [1]:

The emissions of CO from biofuel use in the developing world, 156 Tg, are about 50% of the estimated global CO emissions from fossil fuel use and industry. The emission of 0.9 Pg C (as CO2) from burning of biofuels and field residues together is small, but nonnegligible when compared with the emissions of CO2 from fossil fuel use and industry, 5.3 Pg C. [1]

In the US, corn and switchgrass biofuel production by fermentation to ethanol increases carbon emissions significantly:

By using a worldwide agricultural model to estimate emissions from land-use change, we found that corn-based ethanol, instead of producing a 20% savings, nearly doubles greenhouse emissions over 30 years and increases greenhouse gases for 167 years. Biofuels from switchgrass, if grown on U.S. corn lands, increase emissions by 50%. [3]

References:

  1. http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2003/2002GB001952.shtml
  2. http://www.reuters.com/article/2007/04/18/environment-biofuels-forests-dc-idUSL1755907420070418
  3. Use of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from Land-Use Change. T Searchinger, et al. Science 29 February 2008: 319 (5867), 1238-1240.[DOI:10.1126/science.1151861]
2 added link for third source
source | link

There absolutely is evidence that biofuel production adversely affects the environment. For example, Brazil is losing vast amounts of rainforest that is clearcut and burned to plant biofuel crops (2). It has also been shown that, in the third world, biofuel combustion for heating, cooking, etc., results in 17% of the carbon dioxide and 50% of the carbon monoxide emissions that fossil fuel use does (1):

The emissions of CO from biofuel use in the developing world, 156 Tg, are about 50% of the estimated global CO emissions from fossil fuel use and industry. The emission of 0.9 Pg C (as CO2) from burning of biofuels and field residues together is small, but nonnegligible when compared with the emissions of CO2 from fossil fuel use and industry, 5.3 Pg C. (1)

In the US, corn and switchgrass biofuel production by fermentation to ethanol increases carbon emissions significantly:

By using a worldwide agricultural model to estimate emissions from land-use change, we found that corn-based ethanol, instead of producing a 20% savings, nearly doubles greenhouse emissions over 30 years and increases greenhouse gases for 167 years. Biofuels from switchgrass, if grown on U.S. corn lands, increase emissions by 50%. (3)

References:

  1. http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2003/2002GB001952.shtml
  2. http://www.reuters.com/article/2007/04/18/environment-biofuels-forests-dc-idUSL1755907420070418
  3. Use of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from Land-Use Change. T Searchinger, et al. Science 29 February 2008: 319 (5867), 1238-1240.[DOI:10.1126/science.1151861] Use of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from Land-Use Change. T Searchinger, et al. Science 29 February 2008: 319 (5867), 1238-1240.[DOI:10.1126/science.1151861]

There absolutely is evidence that biofuel production adversely affects the environment. For example, Brazil is losing vast amounts of rainforest that is clearcut and burned to plant biofuel crops (2). It has also been shown that, in the third world, biofuel combustion for heating, cooking, etc., results in 17% of the carbon dioxide and 50% of the carbon monoxide emissions that fossil fuel use does (1):

The emissions of CO from biofuel use in the developing world, 156 Tg, are about 50% of the estimated global CO emissions from fossil fuel use and industry. The emission of 0.9 Pg C (as CO2) from burning of biofuels and field residues together is small, but nonnegligible when compared with the emissions of CO2 from fossil fuel use and industry, 5.3 Pg C. (1)

In the US, corn and switchgrass biofuel production by fermentation to ethanol increases carbon emissions significantly:

By using a worldwide agricultural model to estimate emissions from land-use change, we found that corn-based ethanol, instead of producing a 20% savings, nearly doubles greenhouse emissions over 30 years and increases greenhouse gases for 167 years. Biofuels from switchgrass, if grown on U.S. corn lands, increase emissions by 50%. (3)

References:

  1. http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2003/2002GB001952.shtml
  2. http://www.reuters.com/article/2007/04/18/environment-biofuels-forests-dc-idUSL1755907420070418
  3. Use of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from Land-Use Change. T Searchinger, et al. Science 29 February 2008: 319 (5867), 1238-1240.[DOI:10.1126/science.1151861]

There absolutely is evidence that biofuel production adversely affects the environment. For example, Brazil is losing vast amounts of rainforest that is clearcut and burned to plant biofuel crops (2). It has also been shown that, in the third world, biofuel combustion for heating, cooking, etc., results in 17% of the carbon dioxide and 50% of the carbon monoxide emissions that fossil fuel use does (1):

The emissions of CO from biofuel use in the developing world, 156 Tg, are about 50% of the estimated global CO emissions from fossil fuel use and industry. The emission of 0.9 Pg C (as CO2) from burning of biofuels and field residues together is small, but nonnegligible when compared with the emissions of CO2 from fossil fuel use and industry, 5.3 Pg C. (1)

In the US, corn and switchgrass biofuel production by fermentation to ethanol increases carbon emissions significantly:

By using a worldwide agricultural model to estimate emissions from land-use change, we found that corn-based ethanol, instead of producing a 20% savings, nearly doubles greenhouse emissions over 30 years and increases greenhouse gases for 167 years. Biofuels from switchgrass, if grown on U.S. corn lands, increase emissions by 50%. (3)

References:

  1. http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2003/2002GB001952.shtml
  2. http://www.reuters.com/article/2007/04/18/environment-biofuels-forests-dc-idUSL1755907420070418
  3. Use of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from Land-Use Change. T Searchinger, et al. Science 29 February 2008: 319 (5867), 1238-1240.[DOI:10.1126/science.1151861]
1
source | link

There absolutely is evidence that biofuel production adversely affects the environment. For example, Brazil is losing vast amounts of rainforest that is clearcut and burned to plant biofuel crops (2). It has also been shown that, in the third world, biofuel combustion for heating, cooking, etc., results in 17% of the carbon dioxide and 50% of the carbon monoxide emissions that fossil fuel use does (1):

The emissions of CO from biofuel use in the developing world, 156 Tg, are about 50% of the estimated global CO emissions from fossil fuel use and industry. The emission of 0.9 Pg C (as CO2) from burning of biofuels and field residues together is small, but nonnegligible when compared with the emissions of CO2 from fossil fuel use and industry, 5.3 Pg C. (1)

In the US, corn and switchgrass biofuel production by fermentation to ethanol increases carbon emissions significantly:

By using a worldwide agricultural model to estimate emissions from land-use change, we found that corn-based ethanol, instead of producing a 20% savings, nearly doubles greenhouse emissions over 30 years and increases greenhouse gases for 167 years. Biofuels from switchgrass, if grown on U.S. corn lands, increase emissions by 50%. (3)

References:

  1. http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2003/2002GB001952.shtml
  2. http://www.reuters.com/article/2007/04/18/environment-biofuels-forests-dc-idUSL1755907420070418
  3. Use of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from Land-Use Change. T Searchinger, et al. Science 29 February 2008: 319 (5867), 1238-1240.[DOI:10.1126/science.1151861]