2 Explicitly cite the Guinness claim.
source | link

No.

The source is apparently the World News Daily Report, which, as @Jamiec has pointed out, is a fake news site, by their own disclaimer, with stories like ferocius 3-metre-tall squirrels in Australia.

FurtherTheir article claims (my emphasis):

A retired cobbler from northern India, Mahashta Mûrasi, claims he was born in January 1835, making him not only the oldest man on earth, but the oldest to have ever lived, according to the Guiness (sic) World Records.

So, their reference for their claim is Guinness World Records. But, Guinness does not recognise him as the oldest male. Their site explains:

Thomas Peter Thorvald Kristian Ferdinand 'Christian' Mortensen (Denmark/USA, b. 16 August 18­82, d. 25 April 1998) died aged 115 years 252 days. He is the only Nordic person to live beyond the age of 113.

New evidence has come to light that casts doubt on the long-standing longevity record held by Shigechiyo Izumi (Japan). The birth certificate submitted as evidence might actually belong to his older brother, who died at a young age; if the family used Izumi as a 'necronym'­ that is, gave him his dead brother's name, as the new research suggests ­ this means his final age was 105 years old, not 120. The title of oldest man ever, then, passes to Thomas Peter Thorvald Kristian Ferdinand 'Christian' Mortensen.

Note that when Mortenson was alive, the claim would have Mûrasi as being living and older than Mortensen.

Their Twitter account confirms this.

No.

The source is apparently the World News Daily Report, which, as @Jamiec has pointed out, is a fake news site, by their own disclaimer, with stories like ferocius 3-metre-tall squirrels in Australia.

Further, Guinness does not recognise him as the oldest male. Their site explains:

Thomas Peter Thorvald Kristian Ferdinand 'Christian' Mortensen (Denmark/USA, b. 16 August 18­82, d. 25 April 1998) died aged 115 years 252 days. He is the only Nordic person to live beyond the age of 113.

New evidence has come to light that casts doubt on the long-standing longevity record held by Shigechiyo Izumi (Japan). The birth certificate submitted as evidence might actually belong to his older brother, who died at a young age; if the family used Izumi as a 'necronym'­ that is, gave him his dead brother's name, as the new research suggests ­ this means his final age was 105 years old, not 120. The title of oldest man ever, then, passes to Thomas Peter Thorvald Kristian Ferdinand 'Christian' Mortensen.

Note that when Mortenson was alive, the claim would have Mûrasi as being living and older than Mortensen.

Their Twitter account confirms this.

No.

The source is apparently the World News Daily Report, which, as @Jamiec has pointed out, is a fake news site, by their own disclaimer, with stories like ferocius 3-metre-tall squirrels in Australia.

Their article claims (my emphasis):

A retired cobbler from northern India, Mahashta Mûrasi, claims he was born in January 1835, making him not only the oldest man on earth, but the oldest to have ever lived, according to the Guiness (sic) World Records.

So, their reference for their claim is Guinness World Records. But, Guinness does not recognise him as the oldest male. Their site explains:

Thomas Peter Thorvald Kristian Ferdinand 'Christian' Mortensen (Denmark/USA, b. 16 August 18­82, d. 25 April 1998) died aged 115 years 252 days. He is the only Nordic person to live beyond the age of 113.

New evidence has come to light that casts doubt on the long-standing longevity record held by Shigechiyo Izumi (Japan). The birth certificate submitted as evidence might actually belong to his older brother, who died at a young age; if the family used Izumi as a 'necronym'­ that is, gave him his dead brother's name, as the new research suggests ­ this means his final age was 105 years old, not 120. The title of oldest man ever, then, passes to Thomas Peter Thorvald Kristian Ferdinand 'Christian' Mortensen.

Note that when Mortenson was alive, the claim would have Mûrasi as being living and older than Mortensen.

Their Twitter account confirms this.

1
source | link

No.

The source is apparently the World News Daily Report, which, as @Jamiec has pointed out, is a fake news site, by their own disclaimer, with stories like ferocius 3-metre-tall squirrels in Australia.

Further, Guinness does not recognise him as the oldest male. Their site explains:

Thomas Peter Thorvald Kristian Ferdinand 'Christian' Mortensen (Denmark/USA, b. 16 August 18­82, d. 25 April 1998) died aged 115 years 252 days. He is the only Nordic person to live beyond the age of 113.

New evidence has come to light that casts doubt on the long-standing longevity record held by Shigechiyo Izumi (Japan). The birth certificate submitted as evidence might actually belong to his older brother, who died at a young age; if the family used Izumi as a 'necronym'­ that is, gave him his dead brother's name, as the new research suggests ­ this means his final age was 105 years old, not 120. The title of oldest man ever, then, passes to Thomas Peter Thorvald Kristian Ferdinand 'Christian' Mortensen.

Note that when Mortenson was alive, the claim would have Mûrasi as being living and older than Mortensen.

Their Twitter account confirms this.