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I am unable to find a copy of the original study.

I am unable to find a reference to Tharmalingam Senthilomohan, the researcher quoted in the linked article, aside from copies of the linked article.

In the absence of such basic corroborating evidence such as the existence of the researcher, verification of his cited credentials or any scholarly reference to the study, it is difficult to take this claim seriously.

That said, further research has led to a handful of animal studies which tend to support the claim.

This study examined the effects of an extract from papaya seeds on the fertility of female rats, and found that for very high concentrations of the extract, effects could be seen on the fetus, including lower birth weight and "complete resorption of about 30% of the foetuses."

Another study looked at the effect of two compounds from a purified extract on male rats. Both were equally effective in producing, "a gradual and significant decline in cauda epididymal sperm density, percent viable spermatozoa and significant increase in sperm anomalies." The authors conclude that a "Fertility test revealed 100% efficacy."

So it seems there may be somthingsomething to this after all. I wouldn't say it's been conclusively proven, as no trial or study I have found has been conducted on humans, but there is some potential here. Using the Mythbusters rating, I'd call it plausible.

A more complete list of references can be found at the bottom of this website.

I am unable to find a copy of the original study.

I am unable to find a reference to Tharmalingam Senthilomohan, the researcher quoted in the linked article, aside from copies of the linked article.

In the absence of such basic corroborating evidence such as the existence of the researcher, verification of his cited credentials or any scholarly reference to the study, it is difficult to take this claim seriously.

That said, further research has led to a handful of animal studies which tend to support the claim.

This study examined the effects of an extract from papaya seeds on the fertility of female rats, and found that for very high concentrations of the extract, effects could be seen on the fetus, including lower birth weight and "complete resorption of about 30% of the foetuses."

Another study looked at the effect of two compounds from a purified extract on male rats. Both were equally effective in producing, "a gradual and significant decline in cauda epididymal sperm density, percent viable spermatozoa and significant increase in sperm anomalies." The authors conclude that a "Fertility test revealed 100% efficacy."

So it seems there may be somthing to this after all. I wouldn't say it's been conclusively proven, as no trial or study I have found has been conducted on humans, but there is some potential here. Using the Mythbusters rating, I'd call it plausible.

A more complete list of references can be found at the bottom of this website.

I am unable to find a copy of the original study.

I am unable to find a reference to Tharmalingam Senthilomohan, the researcher quoted in the linked article, aside from copies of the linked article.

In the absence of such basic corroborating evidence such as the existence of the researcher, verification of his cited credentials or any scholarly reference to the study, it is difficult to take this claim seriously.

That said, further research has led to a handful of animal studies which tend to support the claim.

This study examined the effects of an extract from papaya seeds on the fertility of female rats, and found that for very high concentrations of the extract, effects could be seen on the fetus, including lower birth weight and "complete resorption of about 30% of the foetuses."

Another study looked at the effect of two compounds from a purified extract on male rats. Both were equally effective in producing, "a gradual and significant decline in cauda epididymal sperm density, percent viable spermatozoa and significant increase in sperm anomalies." The authors conclude that a "Fertility test revealed 100% efficacy."

So it seems there may be something to this after all. I wouldn't say it's been conclusively proven, as no trial or study I have found has been conducted on humans, but there is some potential here. Using the Mythbusters rating, I'd call it plausible.

A more complete list of references can be found at the bottom of this website.

3 deleted 174 characters in body
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I am unable to find a copy of the original study.

I am unable to find a reference to Tharmalingam Senthilomohan, the researcher quoted in the linked article, aside from copies of the linked article.

In the absence of such basic corroborating evidence such as the existence of the researcher, verification of his cited credentials or any scholarly reference to the study, I remain skeptical of the claims madeit is difficult to take this claim seriously.

I should also note that even if the study could have been verified as existing at allThat said, I would have still been skeptical of its results in the absence of any kind of independent reproduction.

Edit: Furtherfurther research has led to a handful of animal studies which tend to support the claim.

This study examined the effects of an extract from papaya seeds on the fertility of female rats, and found that for very high concentrations of the extract, effects could be seen on the fetus, including lower birth weight and "complete resorption of about 30% of the foetuses."

Another study looked at the effect of two compounds from a purified extract on male rats. Both were equally effective in producing, "a gradual and significant decline in cauda epididymal sperm density, percent viable spermatozoa and significant increase in sperm anomalies." The authors conclude that a "Fertility test revealed 100% efficacy."

So it seems there may be somthing to this after all. I wouldn't say it's been conclusively proven, as no trial or study I have found has been conducted on humans, but there is some potential here. Using the Mythbusters rating, I'd call it plausible.

A more complete list of references can be found at the bottom of this website.

I am unable to find a copy of the original study.

I am unable to find a reference to Tharmalingam Senthilomohan, the researcher quoted in the linked article, aside from copies of the linked article.

In the absence of such basic corroborating evidence such as the existence of the researcher, verification of his cited credentials or any scholarly reference to the study, I remain skeptical of the claims made.

I should also note that even if the study could have been verified as existing at all, I would have still been skeptical of its results in the absence of any kind of independent reproduction.

Edit: Further research has led to a handful of animal studies which tend to support the claim.

This study examined the effects of an extract from papaya seeds on the fertility of female rats, and found that for very high concentrations of the extract, effects could be seen on the fetus, including lower birth weight and "complete resorption of about 30% of the foetuses."

Another study looked at the effect of two compounds from a purified extract on male rats. Both were equally effective in producing, "a gradual and significant decline in cauda epididymal sperm density, percent viable spermatozoa and significant increase in sperm anomalies." The authors conclude that a "Fertility test revealed 100% efficacy."

So it seems there may be somthing to this after all. I wouldn't say it's been conclusively proven, as no trial I have found has been conducted on humans, but there is some potential here. Using the Mythbusters rating, I'd call it plausible.

A more complete list of references can be found at the bottom of this website.

I am unable to find a copy of the original study.

I am unable to find a reference to Tharmalingam Senthilomohan, the researcher quoted in the linked article, aside from copies of the linked article.

In the absence of such basic corroborating evidence such as the existence of the researcher, verification of his cited credentials or any scholarly reference to the study, it is difficult to take this claim seriously.

That said, further research has led to a handful of animal studies which tend to support the claim.

This study examined the effects of an extract from papaya seeds on the fertility of female rats, and found that for very high concentrations of the extract, effects could be seen on the fetus, including lower birth weight and "complete resorption of about 30% of the foetuses."

Another study looked at the effect of two compounds from a purified extract on male rats. Both were equally effective in producing, "a gradual and significant decline in cauda epididymal sperm density, percent viable spermatozoa and significant increase in sperm anomalies." The authors conclude that a "Fertility test revealed 100% efficacy."

So it seems there may be somthing to this after all. I wouldn't say it's been conclusively proven, as no trial or study I have found has been conducted on humans, but there is some potential here. Using the Mythbusters rating, I'd call it plausible.

A more complete list of references can be found at the bottom of this website.

2 added 1458 characters in body; added 66 characters in body
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I am unable to find a copy of the original study.

I am unable to find a reference to Tharmalingam Senthilomohan, the researcher quoted in the linked article, aside from copies of the linked article.

In the absence of such basic corroborating evidence such as the existence of the researcher, verification of his cited credentials or any scholarly reference to the study, I remain skeptical of the claims made.

I should also note that even if the study could have been verified as existing at all, I would have still been skeptical of its results in the absence of any kind of independent reproduction.

Edit: Further research has led to a handful of animal studies which tend to support the claim.

This study examined the effects of an extract from papaya seeds on the fertility of female rats, and found that for very high concentrations of the extract, effects could be seen on the fetus, including lower birth weight and "complete resorption of about 30% of the foetuses."

Another study looked at the effect of two compounds from a purified extract on male rats. Both were equally effective in producing, "a gradual and significant decline in cauda epididymal sperm density, percent viable spermatozoa and significant increase in sperm anomalies." The authors conclude that a "Fertility test revealed 100% efficacy."

So it seems there may be somthing to this after all. I wouldn't say it's been conclusively proven, as no trial I have found has been conducted on humans, but there is some potential here. Using the Mythbusters rating, I'd call it plausible.

A more complete list of references can be found at the bottom of this website.

I am unable to find a copy of the original study.

I am unable to find a reference to Tharmalingam Senthilomohan, the researcher quoted in the linked article, aside from copies of the linked article.

In the absence of such basic corroborating evidence such as the existence of the researcher, verification of his cited credentials or any scholarly reference to the study, I remain skeptical of the claims made.

I should also note that even if the study could have been verified as existing at all, I would have still been skeptical of its results in the absence of any kind of independent reproduction.

I am unable to find a copy of the original study.

I am unable to find a reference to Tharmalingam Senthilomohan, the researcher quoted in the linked article, aside from copies of the linked article.

In the absence of such basic corroborating evidence such as the existence of the researcher, verification of his cited credentials or any scholarly reference to the study, I remain skeptical of the claims made.

I should also note that even if the study could have been verified as existing at all, I would have still been skeptical of its results in the absence of any kind of independent reproduction.

Edit: Further research has led to a handful of animal studies which tend to support the claim.

This study examined the effects of an extract from papaya seeds on the fertility of female rats, and found that for very high concentrations of the extract, effects could be seen on the fetus, including lower birth weight and "complete resorption of about 30% of the foetuses."

Another study looked at the effect of two compounds from a purified extract on male rats. Both were equally effective in producing, "a gradual and significant decline in cauda epididymal sperm density, percent viable spermatozoa and significant increase in sperm anomalies." The authors conclude that a "Fertility test revealed 100% efficacy."

So it seems there may be somthing to this after all. I wouldn't say it's been conclusively proven, as no trial I have found has been conducted on humans, but there is some potential here. Using the Mythbusters rating, I'd call it plausible.

A more complete list of references can be found at the bottom of this website.

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