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There are some people who continue to believe that there is a link between vaccination and autism. See this question for more:

Some claim that the "vaccine denial" viewpoint is correlated with liberal political beliefs, in the United States.

For example, Chris Mooney argues in Mother Jones

So is there a case study of science denial that largely occupies the political left? Yes: the claim that childhood vaccines are causing an epidemic of autism. Its most famous proponents are an environmentalist (Robert F. Kennedy Jr.) and numerous Hollywood celebrities (most notably Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carrey). The Huffington Post gives a very large megaphone to denialists. And Seth Mnookin, author of the new book The Panic Virus, notes that if you want to find vaccine deniers, all you need to do is go hang out at Whole Foods.

He further defends this view in his blog, but says there is very little polling data to support it.

Have there been any studies that support this conclusion?

(Specifically, I speculate that "vaccine denial" might be more correlated with general paranoia about government / corporate conspiracies and less with traditional US Left-Right political axes.) Furthermore, is "vaccine denial" in general correlated?

There are some people who continue to believe that there is a link between vaccination and autism. See this question for more:

Some claim that the "vaccine denial" viewpoint is correlated with liberal political beliefs, in the United States.

For example, Chris Mooney argues in Mother Jones

So is there a case study of science denial that largely occupies the political left? Yes: the claim that childhood vaccines are causing an epidemic of autism. Its most famous proponents are an environmentalist (Robert F. Kennedy Jr.) and numerous Hollywood celebrities (most notably Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carrey). The Huffington Post gives a very large megaphone to denialists. And Seth Mnookin, author of the new book The Panic Virus, notes that if you want to find vaccine deniers, all you need to do is go hang out at Whole Foods.

He further defends this view in his blog, but says there is very little polling data to support it.

Have there been any studies that support this conclusion?

(Specifically, I speculate that "vaccine denial" might be more correlated with general paranoia about government / corporate conspiracies and less with traditional US Left-Right political axes.)

There are some people who continue to believe that there is a link between vaccination and autism. See this question for more:

Some claim that the "vaccine denial" viewpoint is correlated with liberal political beliefs, in the United States.

For example, Chris Mooney argues in Mother Jones

So is there a case study of science denial that largely occupies the political left? Yes: the claim that childhood vaccines are causing an epidemic of autism. Its most famous proponents are an environmentalist (Robert F. Kennedy Jr.) and numerous Hollywood celebrities (most notably Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carrey). The Huffington Post gives a very large megaphone to denialists. And Seth Mnookin, author of the new book The Panic Virus, notes that if you want to find vaccine deniers, all you need to do is go hang out at Whole Foods.

He further defends this view in his blog, but says there is very little polling data to support it.

Have there been any studies that support this conclusion?

Furthermore, is "vaccine denial" in general correlated?

5 replaced http://skeptics.stackexchange.com/ with https://skeptics.stackexchange.com/
source | link

There are some people who continue to believe that there is a link between vaccination and autism. See this question for more:

Some claim that the "vaccine denial" viewpoint is correlated with liberal political beliefs, in the United States.

For example, Chris Mooney argues in Mother Jones

So is there a case study of science denial that largely occupies the political left? Yes: the claim that childhood vaccines are causing an epidemic of autism. Its most famous proponents are an environmentalist (Robert F. Kennedy Jr.) and numerous Hollywood celebrities (most notably Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carrey). The Huffington Post gives a very large megaphone to denialists. And Seth Mnookin, author of the new book The Panic Virus, notes that if you want to find vaccine deniers, all you need to do is go hang out at Whole Foods.

He further defends this view in his blog, but says there is very little polling data to support it.

Have there been any studies that support this conclusion?

(Specifically, I speculate that "vaccine denial" might be more correlated with general paranoia about government / corporate conspiracies and less with traditional US Left-Right political axes.)

There are some people who continue to believe that there is a link between vaccination and autism. See this question for more:

Some claim that the "vaccine denial" viewpoint is correlated with liberal political beliefs, in the United States.

For example, Chris Mooney argues in Mother Jones

So is there a case study of science denial that largely occupies the political left? Yes: the claim that childhood vaccines are causing an epidemic of autism. Its most famous proponents are an environmentalist (Robert F. Kennedy Jr.) and numerous Hollywood celebrities (most notably Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carrey). The Huffington Post gives a very large megaphone to denialists. And Seth Mnookin, author of the new book The Panic Virus, notes that if you want to find vaccine deniers, all you need to do is go hang out at Whole Foods.

He further defends this view in his blog, but says there is very little polling data to support it.

Have there been any studies that support this conclusion?

(Specifically, I speculate that "vaccine denial" might be more correlated with general paranoia about government / corporate conspiracies and less with traditional US Left-Right political axes.)

There are some people who continue to believe that there is a link between vaccination and autism. See this question for more:

Some claim that the "vaccine denial" viewpoint is correlated with liberal political beliefs, in the United States.

For example, Chris Mooney argues in Mother Jones

So is there a case study of science denial that largely occupies the political left? Yes: the claim that childhood vaccines are causing an epidemic of autism. Its most famous proponents are an environmentalist (Robert F. Kennedy Jr.) and numerous Hollywood celebrities (most notably Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carrey). The Huffington Post gives a very large megaphone to denialists. And Seth Mnookin, author of the new book The Panic Virus, notes that if you want to find vaccine deniers, all you need to do is go hang out at Whole Foods.

He further defends this view in his blog, but says there is very little polling data to support it.

Have there been any studies that support this conclusion?

(Specifically, I speculate that "vaccine denial" might be more correlated with general paranoia about government / corporate conspiracies and less with traditional US Left-Right political axes.)

4 added 22 characters in body
source | link

There are some people who continue to believe that there is a link between vaccination and autism. See this question for more:

Some claim that the "vaccine denial" viewpoint is correlated with liberal political beliefs, in the United States.

For example, Chris Mooney argues in Mother Jones

So is there a case study of science denial that largely occupies the political left? Yes: the claim that childhood vaccines are causing an epidemic of autism. Its most famous proponents are an environmentalist (Robert F. Kennedy Jr.) and numerous Hollywood celebrities (most notably Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carrey). The Huffington Post gives a very large megaphone to denialists. And Seth Mnookin, author of the new book The Panic Virus, notes that if you want to find vaccine deniers, all you need to do is go hang out at Whole Foods.

He further defends this view in his blog, but says there is very little polling data to support it.

Have there been any studies that support this conclusion?

(Specifically, I speculate that "vaccine denial" might be more correlated with general paranoia about government / corporate conspiracies and less with traditional US Left-Right political axes.)

There are some people who continue to believe that there is a link between vaccination and autism. See this question for more:

Some claim that the "vaccine denial" viewpoint is correlated with liberal political beliefs.

For example, Chris Mooney argues in Mother Jones

So is there a case study of science denial that largely occupies the political left? Yes: the claim that childhood vaccines are causing an epidemic of autism. Its most famous proponents are an environmentalist (Robert F. Kennedy Jr.) and numerous Hollywood celebrities (most notably Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carrey). The Huffington Post gives a very large megaphone to denialists. And Seth Mnookin, author of the new book The Panic Virus, notes that if you want to find vaccine deniers, all you need to do is go hang out at Whole Foods.

He further defends this view in his blog, but says there is very little polling data to support it.

Have there been any studies that support this conclusion?

(Specifically, I speculate that "vaccine denial" might be more correlated with general paranoia about government / corporate conspiracies and less with traditional US Left-Right political axes.)

There are some people who continue to believe that there is a link between vaccination and autism. See this question for more:

Some claim that the "vaccine denial" viewpoint is correlated with liberal political beliefs, in the United States.

For example, Chris Mooney argues in Mother Jones

So is there a case study of science denial that largely occupies the political left? Yes: the claim that childhood vaccines are causing an epidemic of autism. Its most famous proponents are an environmentalist (Robert F. Kennedy Jr.) and numerous Hollywood celebrities (most notably Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carrey). The Huffington Post gives a very large megaphone to denialists. And Seth Mnookin, author of the new book The Panic Virus, notes that if you want to find vaccine deniers, all you need to do is go hang out at Whole Foods.

He further defends this view in his blog, but says there is very little polling data to support it.

Have there been any studies that support this conclusion?

(Specifically, I speculate that "vaccine denial" might be more correlated with general paranoia about government / corporate conspiracies and less with traditional US Left-Right political axes.)

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2 Extracted claim, which was actually in a separate article to the one cited. Minor formatting.
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