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-2 votes

Were there 20,000 Jewish people in Lebanon in 1948?

The numbers seem to be disputed depending on who your sources are. The official numbers based on documented numbers are lower than 20,000. The numbers given by unofficial tallies (usually from ...
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Schmerel's user avatar
-2 votes

Do modern nuclear weapons produce no nuclear fallout?

A hydrogen bomb works by using nuclear fusion, hydrogen is fused into helium. These two elements are in the top row of the periodic table and there are no radioactive isotopes or nuclear fallout from ...
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quarague's user avatar
  • 1,822
-2 votes
1 answer
636 views

Is The Bell Curve really refuted? [closed]

The Bell Curve is a controversial book about IQ and, in a broad sense of the expression, success in life from 1994. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bell_Curve In this Wikipedia article, in the ...
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d-b's user avatar
  • 1
-6 votes

Do Israeli quadcopters play sounds to lure people out of their homes?

I am also trying to understand the logic of this strategy The implication that the IDF is "playing audio recordings of crying infants and women in order to lure Palestinians to locations where ...
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DWJO's user avatar
  • 1
6 votes

Do women get cheaper car insurance?

Drivers are amongst the most highly 'statistised' group in the world. The stats gathered by insurers are in many ways intrusive but that allows them to gather huge amounts of data, and then tweak ...
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Neil's user avatar
  • 169
-2 votes

Did more people watch Infowars than CNN?

It's not possible to get exact viewing counts as those would be published from Alex Jones so there is no way to confirm accuracy, and I could not find these numbers nonetheless. Going off of the other ...
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Henry Gagnier's user avatar
-8 votes

Did more people watch Infowars than CNN?

CNN had around 800k viewers a day, at its all time peak. Ever. Infowars gets over 500k visits per day not unique users so we can estimate unique users can be 300k, now. We're not even talking peak ...
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islamic guide's user avatar
9 votes

Has Biden spent 40% of his presidency on vacation?

Biden’s “vacations”, according to a NY Post article, consisted mostly of “personal overnight trips away from the White House”. That means he probably takes a helicopter to his home in Delaware to ...
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monfster's user avatar
  • 117
84 votes

Has Biden spent 40% of his presidency on vacation?

If you count all weekend days as "on vacation", which this accounting does, that's almost 29% right there, while the remaining 11% is composed of other days when Biden was not at the White ...
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antlersoft's user avatar
  • 2,907
-1 votes

Was this image of Cecil Williams drinking from a "white only" fountain digitally manipulated?

This sign could not have been produced with typesetting in the 1950s, not even hot metal typesetting: When printing large scale letters in posters etc. the metal type would have proved too heavy and ...
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Avery's user avatar
  • 46.3k
0 votes

Did the Quran predict the speed of light?

The question explicitly stated "geocentric frame", so all answers using "sidereal" measurements of months, days, and years for this question are pointless. Using synodic ...
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Ray Butterworth's user avatar
-2 votes

Is the name of Prophet Muhammad mentioned in the Bible?

No. According to the claim, the verse in SoS says: Hikko Mamittakim we kullo Muhammadim Zehdoodeh WA Zehraee Bayna Jerusalem. No, it does not. It says: חִכּוֹ֙ מַֽמְתַקִּ֔ים וְכֻלּ֖וֹ מַחֲמַדִּ֑ים ...
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Tim Hawkins's user avatar
-1 votes

Were most of the people killed by Hamas on October 7 Israeli soldiers (at some point)?

Addressing the Graphic I ran the following graphic which seems to be used in the above Tweet through OCR I then broke it apart on what seemed to me like military titles NADAV GOLDSTEIN LIMOR VAKNIN ...
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Evan Carroll's user avatar
  • 30.6k
-1 votes

Do EU sanctions prevent Russian visitors from bringing their smartphones/toothpaste with them into the EU?

are Russian tourists prohibited from entering EU member states with smartphones/toothpaste for their personal use? Based on the document you have just quoted, the answer to your question (as it was ...
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Bronx's user avatar
  • 101
1 vote

Do EU sanctions prevent Russian visitors from bringing their smartphones/toothpaste with them into the EU?

It looks like yes, it does. But it seems it has to be proven that the item originates from Russia. It can be a bit tricky with the electronic devices sometimes. Because for instance a Google Pixel ...
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ivkremer's user avatar
  • 119
-1 votes

Is the fruit of Ficus Benjamina (Weeping Fig) poisonous?

This seems to come down to the precise definition of "edible". Apparently, the fruit is not really poisonous (in the sense of causing serious health problems), but it can upset the stomach, ...
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sleske's user avatar
  • 726
0 votes

Do beef farmed pastures net remove carbon emissions?

3 things to keep in mind. Global trends in agriculture are NOT always valid in all regions of the globe. For example it is factually incorrect to extrapolate the global trend <that conversion to ...
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Paul Renaud's user avatar
-3 votes

Can a strong solar storm knock out our power grids for months?

It's often said that a strong solar storm can burn out the biggest transformers which would take months to replace. That would be a horrible mistake on the part of the grid operators. Can it do that? ...
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juhist's user avatar
  • 395
0 votes

Was the golden ratio deliberately used for aesthetics in ancient or Renaissance times?

The golden ratio or golden section was known to Euclid and clearly mentioned in his treaties. Of course the ancients used fractions to approximate irrational numbers as the decimal system had not been ...
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Johannes Van Nostrand's user avatar
11 votes

In the event of a siren warning the public of a gas leak, is it actually advisable to listen to the radio when smelling gas?

This advice is obviously for a chemical leak that occurred outside of the house (e.g., a leak at a chemical plant), as opposed to a natural gas leak that occurred inside the house (e.g., a break in a ...
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David Hammen's user avatar
  • 15.2k
3 votes

Does the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine destroy natural immunity in children?

This is not an answer, rather a comment trying to clear up a misunderstanding pointing out what the technical term vaccine effectiveness means, and that/how negative vaccine effectiveness is nothing ...
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cbeleites unhappy with SX's user avatar
4 votes

Is offshore wind 9 times cheaper than fossil fuel?

No. This is a common trap when comparing the cost of energy from different sources: these costs are not directly comparable. As explained in @IMSoP's answer, the actual claim is somewhat different: it ...
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Zeus's user avatar
  • 295
-3 votes

Did there use to be a law that made attempted suicide a capital offence punishable by hanging in Britain?

The anecdote was likely false because English law in 1858 revised the law on suicide and attempted and made it a misdemeanor punished by 2 years. Norman St.John-Stevas mentions this in his book Life, ...
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JOSEPH DALELIO's user avatar
3 votes

Did NFL player Brian Bosworth sell anti-Boz t-shirts to Denver Broncos fans?

Anti-Boz t-shirts Yes, I can verify at least one design of anti-Boz t-shirt was sold in Denver. The one that can be found on eBay or Etsy is white and has on the front, "BOZ" in large red ...
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Developer63's user avatar
6 votes

Did smallpox emerge in 1580?

What the statement "the evolution of smallpox virus occurred far more recently than previously thought" means is not that it evolved into existence, what it means is that it evolved at all. Today's ...
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Beanluc's user avatar
  • 325
13 votes

Has Newton's Third Law of motion been "debunked" and are there discrepancies in formulas of variation of mass with velocity?

He makes the claim that Newton's Third Law is only true in the limited case of elastic collisions, giving as counter examples inelastic collisions (ball of chewing gum deforms and sticks to wall) and ...
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Tom Goodfellow's user avatar
4 votes

Was plastic from a seaplane shot down in 1944 recently found in an albatross stomach?

According to Wikipedia Bakelite has a density of 1.3 g/cm3 so it would rapidly sink in water. It cannot have been floating in the ocean for 50 years.
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Ken Mercer's user avatar
4 votes

Did one of the victims of the Buffalo shooting invent a water-powered engine for cars?

Without knowing anything at all about the shooting or the person, I can state categorically that he did not invent a working water-powered engine for cars. This is a Physics and Chemistry answer. ...
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nigel222's user avatar
  • 189
1 vote

Can you harvest energy from radio transmissions?

In addition to the other answers, it is the principle by which a crystal radio set (first used by Bose in the 1890's, but not patented until the early 20th centuary) works. This just consists of an ...
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Penguino's user avatar
  • 111
10 votes

Does this article present an accurate summary of the (in)effectiveness of masks at preventing Covid-19 transmission?

While I can't address all the details in the article it's clearly being very deceptive: Covid-19 is mainly spread by microscopic aerosols generated by breathing, talking, sneezing, and coughing. The ...
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Loren Pechtel's user avatar
3 votes

Can Russia's Poseidon nuclear underwater drone create a 500 meter tidal wave?

There's a big problem here: Let's suppose the bomb can actually produce a 500m wave near the point of detonation--what happens? The circumference of a circle is linear to it's radius--double the ...
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Loren Pechtel's user avatar
-1 votes

Is there an unusual distribution of adverse events by lot number for the mRNA COVID-19 vaccines?

There is a very simple, and to me beautiful, explanation. This is original research by me - although I am basing it on facts for which I have sources, though only secondary ones. My main sources are ...
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Nis Jørgensen's user avatar
7 votes

Does your stomach shrink if you eat less?

We can learn some things about the stomach from competitive eaters. Competitive eater Joey Chestnut trains his stomach to expand: Chestnut practices by drinking up to a gallon of milk in a single ...
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joulesm's user avatar
  • 199
-1 votes

Did Michael Jackson sexually abuse children?

To sum it up: We don't know. The issue of child molesting is not the same as, say, a bank robbery. It is usually a hidden crime where no others are involved. The evidence comes down to the victims' ...
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Dirch's user avatar
  • 29
4 votes
Accepted

Are these maps captured Russian plans to invade Ukraine?

I'm not really qualified for a full answer, but... The stuff does look genuine, but it's not sufficient to make conclusions about the actual plans (without knowing more). The table from the workbook ...
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Zeus's user avatar
  • 295
7 votes
1 answer
2k views

Did the Russian 74th motorised rifle brigade surrender in February '22? [closed]

The following statements go around on the major social media networks. However, I have been unable to verify the statements are actually sourced. Ragıp Soylu (Turkey Bureau Chief for MiddleEastEye): ...
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Mast's user avatar
  • 485
-2 votes

Is the "Dutch reach" standard practice in the Netherlands?

It probably falls, and I hope it will, into the same category as the other sayings like: "Going Dutch", "Dutch courage"... Actually there is a whole post related to sayings with '...
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Saxasmu's user avatar
  • 105
6 votes

Is the "Dutch reach" standard practice in the Netherlands?

I am from the Netherlands and I specifically learned it during my driving lessons from my driving instructor. I thought it was a standard thing. I still consistently do it. In my town if you don't do ...
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bananenheld's user avatar
44 votes

Is there an unusual distribution of adverse events by lot number for the mRNA COVID-19 vaccines?

The graph gives the impression that there is a bulge over to the right, indicated by a red arrow. This is because the range of columns 2-3 is a band of "10 deaths" but columns 4-7 have a ...
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Weather Vane's user avatar
  • 7,670
2 votes

Did Martin Luther King, Jr. say that "I will not rejoice in the death of one, not even an enemy"?

Proverbs 24, New International Version translation: [17] Do not gloat when your enemy falls; when they stumble, do not let your heart rejoice, [18] or the Lord will see and disapprove and ...
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wberry's user avatar
  • 209
-1 votes

Have one in four American women had an abortion?

This is likely skewed and inaccurate. It makes assumptions based on questionnaires response average rate and extrapolates it to the whole population. Here are just three reasons why this is wrong: ...
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David Bailey's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
4k views

Did Near, a prominent emulator developer, take their own life?

A couple of weeks ago, there was news in the gaming-related media that Near, the developer of SNES emulators, has reportedly died by suicide. However, the proof of this is an anonymous document posted ...
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Ruslan Oblov's user avatar
  • 3,483
2 votes

Was "their" a singular pronoun in English before the 16th century?

The question could be answered by comparison of the King James Bible (1611 version) with the Wycliffe Bible (1382) but would require some considerable research. Here are two examples I found myself, ...
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Nigel J's user avatar
  • 1,582
14 votes

Were Facebook employees unable to enter their own building to fix router problems, during a recent (six hour) outage?

As Robb Watts' answer states, Facebook has acknowledged this was part of the problem, so we know the claim is true. ("...it took extra time to activate the secure access protocols needed to get ...
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Tiercelet's user avatar
  • 1,137
5 votes

At the current rate are we going run out of fossil fuels by 2060?

While reading the other answers, you might get the impression that fossil fuel availability won't be a problem for 100 years. According to this Nature paper ("Unextractable fossil fuels in a 1.5 ...
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Eric Duminil's user avatar
-3 votes

Is micro rebar a better way to reinforce concrete than rebar?

Helix is just another steel fiber with a good marketing scheme that dupes most people. There is no such thing as micro rebar and all their claims of being ACI certified are fake. ACI does not certify ...
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Mak S's user avatar
  • 7
12 votes
Accepted

Does (diet) soda cause tooth decay?

Summary: Diet drinks are less acidic, but still a problem for dental erosion. Acids can cause erosion of teeth. Saliva acts as a buffer to prevent it. Saliva is more effective against milder acids. [...
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Oddthinking's user avatar
  • 144k
17 votes
2 answers
13k views

Can you breathe underwater using bubbles of air?

A very popular videogame character, which is famous for his sonic speed, is depicted breathing underwater by using air bubbles. Now since I've never heard anyone complaining about this, despite the ...
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Renan's user avatar
  • 2,599
2 votes

Does the average carbon footprint per bitcoin transaction range from 233.4 to 363.5 kg of CO2?

The transaction rate is a matter of public record, and can be seen here for instance. It varies, but seems to typically be in the range of 200k-300k transactions per day. (This is close to the ...
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benrg's user avatar
  • 3,539
9 votes
Accepted

Do the lifetime emissions of 'three and a half Americans' kill 'one person'?

As so often, the claim has not been translated well into headlines, and makes a compelling soundbite without a very deep meaning. The actual central claim is this: adding 4,434 metric tons of carbon ...
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IMSoP's user avatar
  • 9,005
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