260 reputation
138
bio website
location Toronto, Canada
age
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Mar 23 at 16:05

"Enterprise" developer/architect with an EE background and experience/interest in:

  • Microsoft .NET / Visual Studio
  • Delphi
  • VB/VBA (although I try to forget)
  • SQL Server, SQL CE
  • Web Services (SOAP, WSE, WCF)
  • Web Applications (WebForms, MVC, JS)
  • Embedded Systems (HCxx, PIC, etc.)
  • UI Design & Data Visualization
  • Project Management
  • and probably a bunch of other things...

Mar
23
comment Are American media controlled mostly by Jews?
When I saw all the red and blue, I thought it was reflecting the political spectrum (liberal/conservative/neutral). At least that would have been interesting. Even if this chart were both complete and accurate, and it's pretty clear that it's not, are we supposed to infer some kind of bias or agenda here? Does Mark Zuckerberg have the same beliefs as Larry Kramer? We're talking about genetics here, which means that in terms of the media's impact on society the categorization of "Jew/Goy/Nonwhite" is about as useful as "left handed/right handed/ambidextrous".
Mar
8
comment Can one save up to $160 a year by peeing in the shower?
@Sklivvz: That's a 3.5 gallon toilet, but in the U.S., since 1992, all new toilets have to be 1.6 gallons (6 L) or less, and it seems to be a standard even outside the U.S. now. If you've ever needed to flush multiple times or use a plunger, it's probably a 6 L toilet. Older toilets went all the way up to 7 gallons (26.5 L).
Feb
26
awarded  Commentator
Feb
26
comment Does a -9 dB room cause hallucinations?
I get the impression that all of these studies, especially the ones that specifically reference "sensory deprivation", have subjects sitting in this room doing nothing. Is it possible that simple boredom plays a significant part here?
Aug
31
awarded  Famous Question
Jan
18
awarded  Good Question
Oct
8
awarded  Critic
Aug
27
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
14
awarded  Yearling
Mar
15
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
5
comment Are electronic power consumption “smart meters” an invasion of privacy?
I understand, and I'm not trying to claim that any part of your answer is incorrect. I just wanted to highlight the distinction between the distant potential for an invasion of privacy and the practical likelihood of such an event. The question refers to "smart meters" in general, and this answer refers to a specific (and still somewhat rare) configuration of one.
Aug
5
comment Are electronic power consumption “smart meters” an invasion of privacy?
There's only one mid-peak band in Ontario (may happen twice on some days, but it's the same rate). Time-Of-Use/Time-Of-Day billing can be accomplished with hourly data or even non-interval, banded register meters - however, the hardware generally only supports 4 buckets. So you can feed the billing systems aggregate data, but you still need an MDM to aggregate it, and if it doesn't store the original intervals, then you've lost all this ad-hoc data-mining capability. Plus there's a tangled web of regulatory and communication issues to work out. It's not as simple as just making them smarter.
Aug
5
comment Are electronic power consumption “smart meters” an invasion of privacy?
Perhaps, but you have to understand how much that costs. The utility industry moves at a glacial pace - even the most "cutting-edge" systems tend to incorporate a lot of legacy COBOL. With 1-minute intervals we are talking hundreds of terabytes of data and a whole lot of dedicated, distributed hardware to run it (keep in mind that all of this data actually has to be validated before any money can be attached to it!). Anything may happen in the distant future, but in the near future, this isn't going to be deployed nationwide.
Aug
5
comment Are electronic power consumption “smart meters” an invasion of privacy?
One caveat to this research (which you can see from the graph) is that it requires sampling at a very high frequency; by the looks of the graph, this is picking up 1-minute intervals. Most hardware tracks 60- or 15- or sometimes 5-minute intervals, which gives you way less fidelity and you can't really see the peaks. So this is more of a theoretical invasion of privacy than a practical one.
Jul
24
awarded  Scholar
Jul
24
accepted Does swatting/killing a bee cause the hive to attack?
Jul
16
awarded  Supporter
Jul
15
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
15
comment Does swatting/killing a bee cause the hive to attack?
The first primary source you're now citing is the same one I referenced in the question, which states that a pheromone is released, but also states that this is done (a) when guarding the hive and (b) inside the colony. Second source is not primary but does provide references, so it does lend some credence to the theory; what's still lacking is some evidence that (1) a dead/crushed bee releases this pheromone in significant quantities and/or (2) it's detectable by other bees at any significant distance from the hive (i.e. more than a few feet away). Thoughts?
Jul
15
comment Does swatting/killing a bee cause the hive to attack?
I listed those sources because they are not primary sources as far as I can tell, and don't cite primary sources (or when they do, seem to extrapolate more than they should from the primaries). The sum total of all of this only tells me that an arbitrarily-sized subset of beekeepers agree; while it's better than nothing, it's not the most convincing of evidence.