The tag has no wiki summary.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

3
votes
0answers
232 views

Are the top ten flashlight apps maliciously stealing data and sending it to China, India, and Russia? [closed]

There's an interesting report from a company called SnoopWall that is detailed in this YouTube video from a Special Report with Bret Baier with Fox News. In the report "Cybersecurity Expert" Gary ...
6
votes
0answers
233 views

Did Russian hackers obtain billions of passwords?

Many news outlets seem to be reporting this story (NY Times article) about Russian hackers allegedly acquiring billions of usernames and passwords. A Russian crime ring has amassed the largest ...
45
votes
2answers
9k views

Does the “Nonstop Elevator Hack” work?

I stumbled across this claim pretty often in the last few years. Now the problem is that I wasn't able to reproduce it but maybe it was just because I rarely visit tall buildings with multiple ...
0
votes
0answers
194 views

Can ceramic ball bearings function as lethal projectiles inside a bomb?

In the movie "Act of Valor", there is a scene showing Shabal inspecting suicide bomb vests in a factory. The vests are lined with ceramic ball bearings that function like a claymore mine when ...
5
votes
1answer
337 views

Sharing tool claims files can be “unshared”

A company called Intralinks sells a sharing software that it claims allows you to "unshare": “Favorite” files so you can access them offline UNshare™ gives you the power to instantly revoke ...
1
vote
0answers
194 views

If Mint is hacked will I lose my money? [closed]

This question crops up from time to time and a recent example of the ensuing discussion can be found in this reddit thread: Concerns About Mint. The gist of the issue is that Mint, a financial ...
2
votes
0answers
53 views

Can we trust firmware updates in light of stuxnet and the Target breach? [closed]

How about when self-driving cars receive auto part software updates?
5
votes
1answer
312 views

Can NSA's portable surveillance radars emit 1kW of RF energy?

I came across this talk by Jacob Appelbaum, where he revealed some tools used by NSA for the mass surveillance via TAO. At the end of the talk he also added that the NSA could actually beam a 1 kW RF ...
8
votes
1answer
212 views

Do US agents intercept and install spyware on new computers ordered by persons of interest?

In a Fox news article entitled "German magazine claims NSA hacking unit uses powerful methods to obtain data", a magazine article in Der Spiegel is cited as claiming, among other things: ...if the ...
8
votes
1answer
316 views

Do BT routers secretly connect to a NSA/GHCQ network?

Today I was pointed at this document which claims, among other things, that the secret agencies perform man-in-the-middle attacks by using a second network connection established by the home router. ...
13
votes
2answers
1k views

Can cardiac rhythms be used to uniquely identify a person?

Nymi, claims: "Like a fingerprint, your heartbeat is unique", and "Your Nymi lets you use your unique cardiac rhythm to authenticate your identity" Is it true that heartbeats are unique, like ...
6
votes
1answer
551 views

Do 1.4 million Americans have Top Secret clearance?

One of the claims related to the PRISM scandal is that, regardless what NSA and other agencies assert, leaks are inevitable because of sheer number of people with access to secrets. According to this ...
18
votes
1answer
3k views

Do removable faceplates on car stereos deter theft?

Everyone has probably seen a car stereo head unit with a removable face plate; the idea being you can take the faceplate with you to deter theft. The claim is specifically made in this product ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Is there a mechanism to stop theft of supermarket trolleys?

On the supermarket trolley, a notice says that the trolley will stop if you try to take it outside the precincts of the shop. Is it true? Is so, how does it work? Example sign from Hyperorg.com
32
votes
3answers
13k views

Will entering the ATM's PIN in reverse notify the police?

I received a rather intriguing email. It says that if I am at an ATM and I'm in the process of getting robbed, I just enter my PIN in reverse order e.g. 4321 instead of 1234. The ATM will still give ...
16
votes
2answers
2k views

Are locks as easy to pick as in the movies?

Are door locks as easy to pick as in the movies? They seem to only take around 2-3 seconds to pick be it with a credit card or a hairpin. Is this realistic? Or is it simply Hollywood being Hollywood? ...
4
votes
1answer
363 views

What info should I keep secret to avoid identity theft?

According to the New York State police, All an identity thief needs is any combination of your Social Security number, birth date, address, and phone number. while the UK ActionFraud police (in ...
21
votes
1answer
3k views

Is it possible to recover data on a zeroed hard drive?

Let's assume that I have a modern magnetic (not SSD) hard drive, manufactured within the past ten years, and the hard drive is packed with the only copies of an unpublished paper about cheap cold ...
5
votes
1answer
512 views

Fooling a commercial security door using printed scan of a fingerprint

According to wikipedia,the popular program called MythBusters were able to fool a security door with a printed scan of a fingerprint ^ "Crimes and Myth-Demeanors 1". Mythbusters. episode 16. ...
17
votes
3answers
1k views

Does scam-baiting make a noticeable difference to the prevention of internet fraud?

So I've recently found out about scam-baiting, and I've discovered a whole community around just wasting the times of scammers, such as 419Baiter and TheScamBaiter. A lot of the people there are ...
11
votes
1answer
6k views

Is it safer to NOT light your house at night?

At some point, I read a news report that investigators found out it is actually safer not to light your house when you are not there or when asleep. It mentioned that thieves found very dark places ...
17
votes
0answers
1k views

Is owning a handgun for personal protection justifiable under risk analysis? [closed]

There is a common saying in the United States that "it's better to own a gun and not use it, than need a gun and not have it." Unwilling to accept such commonplaces in my decisions regarding security, ...
11
votes
0answers
620 views

Do home alarm systems reduce burglaries?

Does installing an alarm system in your home have an effect on the number or results of burglaries? I am about to buy a house with an alarm system installed, with a siren/flash light on the front ...
10
votes
1answer
2k views

Can the USA turn off the whole internet by deactivating root DNS severs based there?

Drinking with a friend, he told me how his lecturer had revealed to his class that the US can turn off the Internet for the whole world if it wants to, because all of the DNS root servers are there. I ...
5
votes
0answers
319 views

Is there any proof, enhanced airport security in US has significantly reduced terror attacks in US plane? [closed]

This question is similar to Has the U.S. Transport Security Administration been an effective deterrent for terrorist attacks? but I am asking for data, not an opinion. Is there any proof these ...
4
votes
1answer
260 views

Is the number of Windows users without security software now equivalent to the total number of Apple users?

According to Leo Laporte (on the podcast Security Now), Mac users are now targeted by malware because most of the larger base of Windows users use security software. Here is the exact quote: LEO: ...
17
votes
1answer
1k views

Was the C compiler trojan horse written by Ken Thompson ever distributed?

This is a followup to the comments in this question. Thanks to Oddthinking for bringing up the issue. Ken Thompson gave a famous speech upon receiving an award titled "Reflections on Trusting Trust" ...
9
votes
2answers
1k views

Have “backdoors” in software programs been seen in the real world?

Has there ever been a software program that has been shown to have an in-bad-faith "backdoor" allowing privileged access? When I say "in bad faith" I mean, "that cannot be credibly explained by ...
7
votes
2answers
407 views

Can diabetics with pumps be killed from a half mile away?

Black Hat: Lethal Hack and wireless attack on insulin pumps to kill people Like something straight out of science fiction, an attacker with a powerful antenna could be up to a half mile away ...
19
votes
2answers
1k views

Does banning liquids from planes verifiably improve flight safety? [closed]

I don't think I need to reference the now ubiquitous idea that, somehow, the presence of liquids in a passenger's carry-on luggage constitute a danger for the safety of the flight (and thus justifies ...
6
votes
1answer
277 views

Are contactless payment cards/phones insecure?

I've heard claims that contactless cards and NFC is no less secure than chip and PIN as indicated below. According to Barclays: All our new Contactless debit cards include the latest advanced ...
118
votes
9answers
8k views

Is closed-source code more secure than open-source?

My computing teacher told us that closed source software is more secure than open source software, because with open source "anyone can modify it and put stuff in." This is why they do not want to use ...
21
votes
1answer
6k views

Can the Rape-aXe only be removed by a doctor?

The Rape-aXe was a prototype of a female condom designed to attach itself to an attacker's penis with barbs if an attacker attempts to penetrate the woman wearing the Rape-aXe. The inventor claims ...
59
votes
3answers
8k views

The origin of “99 cents”

I've seen two competing theories on the origin of pricing products at $<desired dollar amount minus 1>.99 (i.e. charging $19.99 instead of $20, of $5.99 instead of $6): Psychological pricing ...